The Well-Tempered Ear

Should classical music be amplified and use more crossover programming and different venues to reach young people? | September 12, 2010

By Jacob Stockinger

Should classical music turn to electronic amplification — and maybe adopt other generally frowned upon practices — to reach out to younger audiences?

Should classical music do more crossover programming to reach young ears?

That kind of abandoning of certain practices or traditions has been the subject of a heated debate among classical music bloggers and fans for a long time but especially this past week.

Here are a couple of links to websites that talk about the subject matter and enter into the debate.

Composer Jonathan Harvey (below), in the newspaper The Observer, calls for such changes:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/sep/05/jonathan-harvey-classical-music-amplifiers

Harvey also defends incoirpating  amplification in his own music:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/3558730/Jonathan-Harvey-how-I-gave-voice-to-an-orchestra.html

And music critic Fiona Maddocks (below) responds abut altering the conventions of classical music in general:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/sep/05/jonathan-harvey-classical-music-etiquette

Others, including cellist Julian Lloyd-Webber (below), brother of Sir Andrew, have apparently entered into debate, defending some new practices and criticizing others.

http://in.noticios.com/site/46803/http-www-guardian-co-uk-music-2010-sep-05-jonathan-harvey-classical-music-amplifiers.html

http://mimicdebate.blogspot.com/2010/09/should-classical-music-drop-some-of-its.html

You can enter the debate too. What do you think?

Would amplification add to or detract from classical music’s appeal?

Would something be lost?

Should the conventions of classical music be revised or jettisoned?

What about more crossover programming?

The Ear wants to hear.

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Posted in Classical music

5 Comments »

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    Pingback by Should classical music be amplified and use more crossover programming and different venues to reach young people? | 7 Top M Download — September 13, 2010 @ 3:18 pm

  2. In my opinion, amplified classical music often comes off as cheesy, with little appeal to young or old. Perhaps no one has found the right combination yet.

    The most dedicated younger classical music listeners that I have seen were players in their school groups. Ensuring that youth are exposed to classical music as performers would be better than changing the format.

    Comment by John — September 12, 2010 @ 7:42 pm

    • Hi John,
      Thanks for reading and replying.
      I agree with you 1,000 percent.
      Education, not electronics or gimmicks, is the key.
      But I’m anxious to see what others say.
      Best,
      Jake

      Comment by welltemperedear — September 12, 2010 @ 9:41 pm

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