The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music education: Do early music lessons change the brain and affect language learning by older children? | September 15, 2012

By Jacob Stockinger

Scientists are still working at making all the connections and determining all the effects.

But a new study from Northwestern University suggests that early music lessons do indeed positively affect the structure of the brain and help older children learn other important things, including language.

In fact, music lessons may be more important than budget-cutters often think.

Here is a great round-up story that appeared in the Science Times section of the New York Times this past week:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/10/early-music-lessons-have-longtime-benefits/

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5 Comments »

  1. [...] By Jacob Stockinger Scientists are still working at making all the connections and determining all the effects. But a new study from Northwestern University suggests that early music lessons do indeed positively affect the …  [...]

    Pingback by Classical music education: Do you early music lessons change the ... | Languages, Cultures,Teaching & Technology | Scoop.it — September 16, 2012 @ 1:30 pm

  2. [...] By Jacob Stockinger Scientists are still working at making all the connections and determining all the effects. But a new study from Northwestern University suggests that early music lessons do indeed positively affect the …  [...]

    Pingback by Classical music education: Do you early music lessons change the ... | Music House | Scoop.it — September 16, 2012 @ 10:58 am

  3. Beware premature judgment. People who give their
    children music lessons are probably more educated
    and wealthy than those who don’t. The music lessons
    might therefore be a proxy effect.

    Comment by Barry W Brown — September 15, 2012 @ 10:48 am

    • Hi Barry,
      Thank you for reading and for replying with a timely caveat that is not covered in the story.
      But there are programs with arts education and music lessons for children who are less affluent. So the research does cut across class to some degree.
      Still, it is good to keep socio-economic conditions in mind when thinking about these things.
      Best,
      Jake

      Comment by welltemperedear — September 17, 2012 @ 8:28 am

  4. Some of the references in the article would appear to also be applicable to children who study acting (auditory, attention, and memory skills). Anecdotally, I note that this year’s National Merit Semifinalists from East High (which is where I know the kids) are actors and musicians. (I’m not sure if one is a musician; I know the rest are and that they all act.) Nothing scientific about that, but interesting.

    Comment by Steve Rankin — September 15, 2012 @ 5:44 am


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