The Well-Tempered Ear

Music education: This coming Friday night, the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras (WYSO) opens its 50th anniversary celebration with a FREE reception for a retrospective art display at Dane County Regional Airport. On this Monday night, mezzo-soprano Allisanne Apple sings a FREE recital.

September 20, 2015
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ALERT: This Monday night, Sept. 21, mezzo-soprano Allisanne Apple (below) and pianist Jane Peckham will present a FREE concert with the theme of  “Home/Travels/Longing/Return” that features songs by Leonard Bernstein, William Bolcom, Aaron Copland, Hugo Wolf and others. The recital is at 7 p.m. in the Oakwood Village West Auditorium, 6209 Mineral Point Road, on Madison’s far west side.

Alisanne Apple BW mug

By Jacob Stockinger

The Ear has been asked to distribute the following public invitation from Bridget Fraser, the executive director of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras (WYSO).

He is happy to do it in the belief that there is no better local investment in music education or in the future of classical music than WYSO, which has educated and trained thousands of area students and their parents over the past half-century.

WYSO Logo blue

Fraser writes:

“This coming Friday, Sept. 25, from 5 to 7 p.m. opens the year-long celebration of our 50th anniversary.

“I hope our friends, former conductors and staff, alumni and faithful supporters will join us as we pay tribute to the amazing impact that WYSO has had and continues to have on hundreds of young musicians each season.

“Local artist and devoted WYSO board member, Andree Valley has captured the true essence and importance of WYSO in a stunning visual display.

“You are invited to attend the opening celebration of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras retrospective exhibit, featuring 50 years of compelling history, captivating photographs and intriguing Art of Note painted violins (below) in an extensive display at the Dane County Regional Airport.

WYSO AoN violins 2015

Here is WYSO founder Marvin Rabin conducting the Youth Orchestra during the 1966-67 season:

WYSO Youth Orchestra Marvin Rabin conducting 1966-7

And here is UW-Madison professor and current WYSO music director James Smith conducting the Youth Orchestra in 2015:

WYSO Youth Orchestra James Smith conducting 2015

And at bottom is a YouTube video of the WYSO Youth Orchestra playing the rousing opening of Georges Bizet‘s Overture to his opera “Carmen.”

“The opening reception will feature music by WYSO’s premier quartet and light refreshments and hors d’oeuvres. Please join us in this tribute to the first 50 years of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras.

This exhibit was organized by Tandem Press, in collaboration with WYSO.
 For more information, click on our reception invitation, or  contact WYSO at (608) 263-3320 or wyso@wyso.music.wisc.edu.


Classical music: Are concert halls and opera houses becoming refuges and shelters from the on-line world of the Web and social media?

September 19, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

Are concert halls and opera houses becoming refuges and shelters from the on-line world of the Web and social media?

New York Times senior music critic Anthony Tommasini (below) thinks so. He published a long essay this week justifying his view.

tommasini-190

Along the way he also offers other suggestions, from alternative venues to informal dress, for how to increase audiences and attendance. And he thinks that live performances might help regain shortened attention spans.

In terms of the digital world, Tommasini even goes so far as to think that providing a refuge from social media could be selling points for the survival of live performances in concert halls and opera houses.

(Below bottom is an iPad in Carnegie Hall, below top, is a photo by Karsten Moran for The New York Times. Tommasini also discusses smart phones and cell phones.)

carnegiehallstage

iPad photo in Carnegie Hall Karsten Moran NYT

The Ear hopes Tommasini might be right, but fears he might be naïve – especially when it comes to younger audiences.

The Ear thinks that the new media may well end up being more powerful than such old media as opera and classical music. He suspects that concert halls and opera houses will end up accommodating and incorporating new media.

But he hopes he is wrong.

What do you think?

And how do you view Tommasini’s arguments or ideas?

The Ear wants to hear.

Here is a link to the essay:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/14/arts/music/the-concert-hall-as-refuge-in-a-restless-web-driven-world.html


Classical music: The Ear needs your help. Rank major Baroque composers Bach, Handel, Telemann and Vivaldi in terms of enjoyability and quality.

September 18, 2015
23 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

Uh-oh.

Last week, The Ear struck a nerve.

He commented that he sometimes wished that the Baroque composer Georg Philipp Telemann (below) – the most prolific composer ever of classical music – had composed less because he might have composed even more compelling music.

georg philipp telemann

Here is a link to that post, which also featured Telemann’s lovely Concerto for Viola in G Major, which The Ear finds quite beautiful and engaging. 

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2015/09/10/classical-music-you-must-hear-this-the-concerto-for-viola-by-georg-philipp-telemann/

Of course what I said was considered heresy by some. I heard some pretty strong rebukes from devout Telemann fans and -– no surprise -– a Telemann scholar.

It’s not that The Ear doesn’t listen to music by Telemann or like many of his works. (One such work is Telemann’s own “Water Music,” which stands comparison to Handel’s “Water Music” and which you can hear in a YouTube video at the bottom.)

But he has to be honest: Telemann is just not tops on his playlist.

Consider the Big Four of Baroque composers (in alphabetical order):

Johann Sebastian Bach

Bach1

George Frideric Handel

Handel etching

Georg Philipp Telemann

and Antonio Vivaldi

vivaldi

When The Ear looks over his CD collection and reviews his listening habits, he finds that what he most often listens to and what he likes best, falls in to the follow ranking: 1. Bach, 2. Vivaldi, 3. Handel and 4. Telemann.

True, Handel would probably rank a spot higher if The Ear really listened to his operas. But even Bach turned to Vivaldi for insights into composing.

So here is what The Ear wants to know:

When you listen to the four Baroque composers, what is the ranking of the four for frequency of listening and enjoyability?

And how do you rank them in terms of quality?

Granted, this business of ranking artists is something of a parlor game. And the results will hardly be definitive in proving anything.

But just maybe others will see that The Ear is not alone in his opinion about the comparative virtues of Telemann, who is certainly a major composer.

So leave your views and ranking in the COMMENTS section.

The Ear wants to hear!


Classical music: Farley’s House of Pianos announces its Salon Piano Series for this season and offers subscription tickets for the first time. It opens on Sunday, Oct. 4.

September 17, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Ear’s friends at Farley’s House of Pianos write:

The Salon Piano Series offers inspiring performances in an intimate salon setting. Each concert is followed by an artist’s reception and some performances include introductions by music scholars and commentators.

Farley Daub plays

Season tickets are being offered for the first time this year and they provide substantial savings as well as the assurance that you won’t be left out. You can buy tickets at www.brownpapertickets.com

Here is the lineup:

DANIEL DEL PINO  – Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015, 4 p.m.

Daniel del Pino (below) returns to play music by Felix Mendelssohn, Cesar Franck‘s Prelude, Chorale and Fugue, and Twelve Etudes, Op. 10, by Frederic Chopin. (You can hear him perform a transcription of the “Ritual Fire Dance” by Manuel de Falla during a concert at Farley’s House of Pianos in January of 2013.)

Daniel del PIno square

ALESSIO BAX and LUCILLE CHUNG (below) – Sunday, Jan. 17, 2016, 4 p.m.

This concert will include pieces for one piano-four hands and for two pianos. The two-piano pieces will be played on rare “twin” pianos restored by Farley’s House of Pianos: a 1914 Mason & Hamlin CC and a 1914 Mason & Hamlin BB.

alessio bax and lucille chung

CELLIST AMIT PELED (below) – Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016, 7:30 p.m.

Hear the exact program that famed cellist Pablo Casals performed 100 years ago, played on Casals’ own 1733 Goffriller cello with Noreen Polera accompanying on a 1914 Mason and Hamlin piano restored by Farley’s House of Pianos.

Amit Peled 1

DICK HYMAN, Jazz Clinic-Lecture, Saturday, May 7, 2016, 4 p.m.

Jazz legend Dick Hyman presents his third clinic at Salon Piano Series.

Dick Hyman – Jazz Concert – Sunday, May 8, 2016, 4 p.m.

Dick will play solo piano for half the concert. Then bassist John Schaffer and drummer John Lombardo will join Dick in a jazz trio.

Since he began his career in the early 1950s, Dick Hyman has been a pianist, organist, arranger, music director and composer while recording over 100 albums under his own name.

Hyman is a masterful improviser with a unique style of piano that spans from early jazz such as Scott Joplin and Jelly Roll Morton to George Gershwin, Duke Ellington and beyond. He is one of the first people to record on the Moog synthesizer and his track “Minotaur” landed on the Billboard magazine’s US Top 40.

Hyman has served as composer, arranger, conductor and pianist for 12 Woody Allen films. He also won an Emmy for his original score to the daytime drama “Sunshine’s on the Way” and for musical direction of a PBS special on Eubie Blake. His recording, Dick Hyman’s “Century of Jazz Piano” is an encyclopedic series of solo performances that covers the last 100 years in jazz over the course of 121 performances.

dick hyman

All concerts are held at Farley’s House of Pianos, 6522 Seybold Road, on Madison’s far west wide near West Towne.

See complete concert programs and more at www.salonpianoseries.org

Salon Piano Series Tickets Available Online at www.brownpapertickets.com

Tickets cost $45 in advance, $50 at the door. The Jazz Clinic is $20.

Buy the series for $160, and save $40. Tickets are also available at Farley’s House of Pianos and Orange Tree Imports. Service fees may apply.


Classical music: The Oakwood Chamber Players open its new season with “Weekend Stroll” this Saturday night and Sunday afternoon.

September 16, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Oakwood Chamber Players (below) will give the kickoff of their 2015-2016 concert series when they present their first concert of the season: Weekend Stroll on this Saturday night and Sunday afternoon.

Oakwood Chamber Players 2015-16

The program will include a two-movement trio from early 20th-century American composer Amy Beach (below), Pastorale and Caprice, for flute, clarinet and piano, subtitled “Watersprites.”

Amy Beach BW 1

Also on the program is the jazz-influenced Suite for horn, clarinet and piano by American composer Alec Wilder (below top). You can hear the work in a YouTube video at the bottom.

Norwegian composer and famed violinist Ole Bull’s best known work, Dairy Maid’s Sunday, arranged by Edvard Grieg, will be performed on violin, viola and cello.

Sonata en Trio for flute, clarinet and piano by French composer Maurice Emmanuel (below bottom, in 1930) takes listeners from a movement of folk-like melodies to a contemplative theme to a dazzling scherzo close.

Alec Wilder

Maurice Emmanuel in1930

Chicago-based composer James Stephenson (below) wrote five short movements for his chamber piece Thinking in 2007. He gives the performers clever and creative musical lines that link to his whimsical movement titles such as: “Outside the Box,” “Twice” and “It’s Over.” The music is vital and virtuosic and at times a bit jazzy. It showcases violin, cello, clarinet, bassoon, piano and trumpet.

James Stephenson composer

The concerts are this weekend: Saturday, Sept. 19 at 7 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 20 at 1:30 p.m. Both concerts will be held at the Oakwood Center for Arts and Education, 6209 Mineral Point Road, on Madison’s far west side.

This is the first of five concerts in the Oakwood Chamber Players 2015-2016 season series titled “Play.” Remaining concerts include Holiday Fun on Nov. 29 (two performances), Fairy Tales and Other Stories on Jan. 16 and 17 (2016), Children’s Games on March 5 and 6 (2016) and Summer Splash on May 14 and 15 (2016).

For a previous post abut the Oakwood Chamber Players’ new season, see:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2015/08/11/classical-music-the-oakwood-chamber-players-announces-its-new-season-for-2015-16/

The Oakwood Chamber Players is a group of Madison-area professional musicians who have rehearsed and performed at Oakwood Village for over 30 years.

Tickets are available at the door and $20 general admission, $15 seniors and $5 students. Visit www.oakwoodchamberplayers.com for more information.

The Oakwood Chamber Players is a professional music ensemble proudly supported by Oakwood Lutheran Senior Ministries and the Oakwood Foundation.


Classical music: The Madison Bach Musicians announces its new season, which includes “Messiah”

September 15, 2015
2 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

Trevor Stephenson, the founder, artistic director and keyboardist of the Madison Bach Musicians, writes:

Dear Friends,

Summer has wound down and Madison Bach Musicians (below) is gearing up for a wonderful concert season: 2015-16 will be our 12th year. Thanks for all your support and encouragement!

Kangwon KIm with Madison Bach Musicians

We’ll open on Oct. 3 and 4 with Baroque Concertos: Johann Sebastian Bach, Heinrich Biber, Leonardo Leo and Antonio Vivaldi.

Our Dec. 12, our Baroque Holiday Concert will feature two outstanding seasonal Cantatas by J.S. Bach (BWV 61 and 151), Arcangelo Corelli‘s Christmas Concerto (at bottom in a YouTube video), and Georg Philipp Telemann‘s Tafelmusik Quartet for baroque flute and strings.

The grand finale for the season on April 8 and 10 will be two performances of George Frideric Handel’s “Messiah” featuring an all-baroque orchestra, eight outstanding vocal soloists, and singers from the Madison Boy Choir (part of Madison Youth Choirs).

Season subscriptions are available until Sept. 21 — online or mail order only. Subscribers receive: Significant savings on ticket prices; priority seating in the first several rows; and invitations to special subscriber lecture events.

You can find out more information and order tickets online at our website www.madisonbachmusicians.org or mail in your season subscription order form and check. Go to “Concerts – Season Overview” on our website to print out our season brochure for the order form.

Tickets for individual concerts are also now available online and at all of our ticket outlet locations: Orange Tree Imports, Willy Street Co-op (east and west), Farley’s House of Pianos, Room of One’s Own bookstore.

We look forward to seeing you at the concerts!

For more information, visit www.madisonbachmusicians.org and www.trevorstephenson.com.

You can also call (608) 238-6092.


Classical music: The Ancora String Quartet opens its new season this coming Saturday night with a program of Mendelssohn, Dohnanyi and Hugo Wolf.

September 14, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Ancora String Quartet will open its new season this coming Saturday night, Sept. 19, at 7:30 p.m. in the Landmark Auditorium of the First Unitarian Society of Madison, 900 University Bay Drive. The historic building was designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright.

Tickets can be purchased at the door: $15 for general admission, $12 for seniors and students; and $6 for children under 12.

The ASQ will welcome back first violinist Leanne League for its 15th Season.

Members of the quartet (below in a photo by Barry Lewis) are violinists Robin Ryan (left) and Leanne Kelso League (right), violist Marika Fischer Hoyt (top center) and cellist Benjamin Whitcomb (bottom center).

Barry Lewis

Members of the Ancora String Quartet play in other groups such as the Madison Symphony Orchestra and the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra. Whitcomb teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

The fall program by the critically acclaimed quartet opens with the luminous and spirited Quartet, Op. 44, No. 3, by Felix Mendelssohn, followed by the darkly impassioned 2nd quartet of Ernő Dohnányi. The storm clouds are dispersed with the program closer, the sunny “Italian Serenade” by Hugo Wolf. (The “Italian Serenade” can be heard in a YouTube video at bottom.)

A champagne reception will close the evening.

Also of interest: The Ancora Quartet will also team up again with the Madison Symphony Orchestra’s Rhapsodie Quartet for a reprise of their performance a few years ago of the Octet by Felix Mendelssohn. The performance will be on Friday, Oct. 9, at the Fort Atkinson Club. For more information, visit: http://www.fortatkinsonclub.org/

 


Classical music: New York Times critic Anthony Tommasini recalls his summer as a teenager listening to Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring” under conductor Leonard Bernstein – with Beethoven’s “Eroica” Symphony thrown in for good measure.

September 13, 2015
2 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

The New York Times has come up with a terrific idea.

It is a series of essays called “Virgin Eyes.” It asks critics to recall a first experience with art or culture that they wish they could experience again, so powerful and formative and long-lasting was the first impression they received from it.

The series covers art and pop music, movies and television shows.

But it also features classical music and opera.

One of the more recent essays -– it should really be called Virgin Ears — was written by senior music critic Anthony Tommasini (below). You may recall he came to Madison several years ago as part of the centennial celebration of the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Pro Arte Quartet.

tommasini-190

In his essay, Tommasini — who is a composer as well as a critic — recalls the formative summer of 1966 he spent listening to Igor Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring” in the hands of conductor Leonard Bernstein and the New York Phiharmonic.

That experience forever changed what Tommasini saw as radical music-making. (You can get a taste of Bernstein’s electrifying interpretation in the YouTube video at the bottom.)

Virgin Eyes Stravinsky

It is a delightful and informative read that echoes our own first experiences – in my case, the first piano recitals I heard by Arthur Rubinstein, Van Cliburn, Vladimir Horowitz and Rudolf Serkin.

Read and see if you don’t agree – and if it doesn’t make you think of your own experiences that you would like to re-live with virgin eyes and ears.

Here it is:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/05/arts/music/how-i-spent-my-summer-with-bernstein-and-stravinsky.html


Classical music: Finals of the Leeds Piano Competition take place this weekend. Here is some background by a judge from the solo semi-finals and an Internet portal to hear the concerto finalists.

September 12, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

Since 1963, the Leeds International Piano Competition in England has brought us such keyboard luminaries as Radu Lupu, Murray Perahia, Mitsuko Uchida, Christopher O’Riley and Andras Schiff as well as Alessio Bax, who will perform in Madison on Sunday, afternoon, Jan. 17, this season with his wife Lucille Chung at Farley’s House of Pianos.

The competition, held every three years, has been taking place over the past two weeks. (You can hear the 2012 winner Federico Colli discuss why the Leeds is important and has helped his own career in a YouTube video at the bottom.)

leeds competition-auditorium logo

This weekend you can take in the finalists in their concerto performances.

Here is a link to the competition home page:

http://www.leedspiano.com

Here is a link with an Internet portal.

But it also features some fascinating background and commentary from a judge or juror about the solo semi-finals.

http://www.classical-music.com/blog/leeds-piano-competition-2015-semi-finals

Happy listening.


Classical music: Meet Marin Alsop, the pioneering American maestra who will conduct the closing concert of the BBC British Proms concerts this Saturday night.

September 11, 2015
1 Comment

By Jacob Stockinger

If you listen regularly to NPR, or National Public Radio, you will often hear stories featuring the American conductor Marin Alsop (below) and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra she leads on Saturday mornings. That is when Scott Simon interviews her about her latest projects for Weekend Edition.

Marin Alsop big

And you may know Alsop’s name as a student and protégée of the legendary Leonard Bernstein and as the music director and conductor of the Sao Paulo Symphony Orchestra in Brazil.

Marin Alsop marching

You might also know that Alsop thinks classical music has become elitist and so she works hard for educational programs and community outreach.

But you may not know that in 2013 Alsop was the first woman chosen to conduct the mammoth closing night of the popular Proms concerts (below) in London’s Royal Albert Hall for the BBC in England. (You can hear the rousing and popular speech she gave then in a YouTube video at the bottom. And be sure to read some of the sexist and homophobic reader comments.)

BBC Proms

This Saturday night she returns to the United Kingdom to conduct the closing concert of this summer’s Proms, which will have a huge audience of over 40 million listeners worldwide via TV, radio and the Internet.

Here is a link to the portal for listening to the concert:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/6vczskH1yMvp1bRKpDpnq4/last-night-of-the-proms-and-proms-in-the-park-2015-how-to-watch-and-listen

Thanks to a story and a Q&A interview in The Economist, here is a chance to meet Marin Alsop and learn more about this impressive musician:

http://www.economist.com/blogs/prospero/2015/08/bbc-proms

 

 


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