The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: Canadian violinist James Ehnes and American composer John Harbison are spotlighted this coming weekend by the Madison Symphony Orchestra | February 11, 2019

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By Jacob Stockinger

Internationally recognized and Grammy Award-winning Canadian violinist James Ehnes returns to Overture Hall this weekend to perform the Brahms Violin Concerto with the Madison Symphony Orchestra (MSO, below in a photo by Greg Anderson).

The program opens with a performance of American composer John Harbison’s The Most Often Used Chords, and closes with Modest Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition.

This program is a continuation of MSO music director John DeMain’s 25th anniversary season.

Performances will be held in Overture Hall, 201 State Street, on Friday, Feb. 15, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 16, at 8 p.m.; and Sunday, Feb. 17, at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets information is below.

“Mussorgsky’s masterpiece explores the colors of the orchestra — the correlation of an artist’s visual medium through the colors of sound and music. And its finale The Great Gate of Kiev (heard in the YouTube video at the bottom), is one of classical music’s greatest hits,” says DeMain (below, in a photo by Greg Anderson).

DeMain adds: “James Ehnes (below, in a  photo by Benjamin Ealovega) is a violinist who is completely to my taste. With an absolutely gorgeous sound and consummate technique, he goes to the heart of the music. He will approach the Brahms violin concerto as a violinist’s violinist, adored by the public, by his colleagues and by me for the integrity in his playing.”

On this Friday afternoon, Feb. 15, from 2:30 to 4 p.m. in Mills Hall, Ehnes will give a free and public master class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Mead Witter School of Music. 

DeMain continues: “We celebrate the 80th birthday of the internationally renowned — and Madison resident — composer John Harbison (below) with the first performance by the MSO of his delightful composition, The Most Often Used Chords.”

Harbison’s The Most Often Used Chords is a satirical piece of “anti-art art,” or “found object,” art. According to the composer, the found object that inspired this symphony (originally titled Fli Accordi Piu Usati) were the pre-printed “Fundamentals of Music” pages that he noticed in an Italian music-writing notebook. The work was originally composed in 1992 for the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra.

Written in 1878, the Brahms Violin Concerto was dedicated to his friend Joseph Joachim and premiered in 1879 in Leipzig, with Joachim soloing and Brahms (below) conducting.

An equal partnership between soloist and ensemble is on full display in this concerto; it is not a piece in which the orchestra serves as mere backdrop. Rather, the violinist and orchestra are a team, collaborating and interacting to recount an elegant and nuanced musical drama.

Originally written as a piano composition, Pictures at an Exhibition by Modest Mussorgsky was composed as a memorial to his friend, the Russian artist Viktor Hartmann, who died in 1873. The suite consists of 10 movements — each a musical depiction of one of 10 paintings by Hartmann. These movements are interspersed with a recurring promenade theme that represents a visitor strolling through the exhibition.

The arrangement by Maurice Ravel (below), produced in 1922, represents a virtuoso effort by a master composer. His instrumental colors — a trumpet solo for the opening Promenade, dark woodwind tones, the piccolo and high strings for the children’s “chicks in shells” — are widely admired. The influence of Ravel’s version may often be discerned in subsequent versions of the suite.

CONCERT AND TICKET DETAILS

The lobby opens 90 minutes prior to each concert. One hour before each performance, Randal Swiggum (below) will lead a 30-minute Prelude Discussion in Overture Hall to enhance concertgoers’ understanding and listening experience. It is free to ticket holders.

The symphony recommends concert attendees arrive early for each performance to make sure they have time to pass through Overture Center’s security stations, and so they can experience the Prelude Discussion.

Program notes for the concerts, written retired MSO trombonist J. Michael Allsen, are available online: http://bit.ly/feb2019programnotes

  • Single Tickets are $18-$93 each and are on sale now at: https://madisonsymphony.org/ehnesthrough the Overture Center Box Office at 201 State Street, or by calling the Box Office at (608) 258-4141. Fees apply to online/phone sales.
  • Groups of 10 or more can save 25% by calling the MSO office at (608) 257-3734. For more information, visit, https://www.madisonsymphony.org/groups.
  • Student rush tickets can be purchased in person on the day of the concert at the Overture Center Box Office at 201 State Street. Students must show a valid student ID and can receive up to two $15 or $20 tickets. More information is at: https://www.madisonsymphony.org/studentrush
  • Seniors age 62 and up receive 20% savings on advance and day-of-concert ticket purchases in select areas of the hall.
  • Flex-ticket booklets of 10 vouchers for 18-19 symphony subscription concerts are available. Learn more at: https://madisonsymphony.org/flex

Discounted seats are subject to availability, and discounts may not be combined.

Major funding for the February concerts is provided by: The Madison Concourse Hotel and Governor’s Club, BMO Harris Bank, Boardman and Clark LLP, Capitol Lakes, Dr. Robert and Linda Graebner, Marvin J. Levy, and Cyrena and Lee Pondrom.

Additional funding is provided by Martha and Charles Casey, and by the Wisconsin Arts Board, with funds from the State of Wisconsin and the National Endowment for the Arts.


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9 Comments »

  1. Please note my email address penny@windwardcom.com has changed to pennylmolina@gmail.com. I love getting your blog so could you please make sure to subtract the old and add the new. Please. Take Care, Penny L. Molina pennyLmolina@gmail.com 608-335-3550

    Comment by Penny Molina — February 13, 2019 @ 9:52 am

    • Thank you for following my blog. But I have no control over email. I suggest you unsubscribe the first one and resubscribe the second one. That usually works.

      Comment by welltemperedear — February 17, 2019 @ 10:15 pm

  2. Delighted that MSO is playing Harbison’s “Used Chords,” a sparklingly effervescent and witty piece that makes brilliant use of a wide orchestral palette. Very engaging and approachable writing, full of abundant good humor. Looking forward to the performances!

    Comment by ARS Nova, LLC — February 12, 2019 @ 3:30 pm

    • I’m sure he’s a nice guy but I don’t care for his music (I haven’t heard “Used Chords” though).

      Too much dissonance, with music suited for academics but no one else and very short on melodies. I’ve heard and disliked his “Quintet for Winds,” his “Mirabai Songs” (truly awful) and “Three City Blocks”.

      Comment by fflambeau — February 12, 2019 @ 10:27 pm

      • Meanwhile, here’s a lovely piece from a much better, in my opinion, American composer: Rick Sowash. It’s called, “The View from Carew” and is for clarinet, cello and piano. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBTndocYN2U

        Comment by fflambeau — February 12, 2019 @ 10:45 pm

  3. Very exciting that Mr. Ehnes just won his 2nd Grammy last night!

    Comment by batcmadison — February 11, 2019 @ 2:18 pm

    • Congratulations to Mr. Ehnes. He deserves it.

      Comment by fflambeau — February 11, 2019 @ 8:48 pm

  4. “Mussorgsky’s masterpiece explores the colors of the orchestra”, says DeMain, who must know that Mussorgsky’s masterpiece, being written for the piano, does nothing of the kind.

    Comment by john holzaepfel — February 11, 2019 @ 7:30 am

    • Correct. It was orchestrated by Ravel. DeMain has never struck me as the sharpest knife in the drawer.

      Comment by fflambeau — February 11, 2019 @ 8:45 pm


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