The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: The Well-Tempered Ear surpasses 2 million hits. Thank you, all!! | March 18, 2019

IF YOU LIKE A CERTAIN BLOG POST, PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD. FORWARD A LINK TO IT OR, SHARE or TAG IT (not just “Like” it) ON FACEBOOK. Performers can use the extra exposure to draw potential audience members to an event.

By Jacob Stockinger

For a variety of reasons, The Ear has not posted anything new in a few days.

That is unusual for this blog.

Some of the reasons were personal.

But the largest reason simply had to do with success and marking a milestone.

Last week, the blog The Well-Tempered Ear surpassed 2 million hits.

Fittingly, the historic moment came while The Ear was attending the outstanding concert by the Madison Symphony Orchestra that featured three of its principal players.

In the beginning, when The Ear started the blog at the request of the Wisconsin Union Theater, such a landmark was never expected and seemed wholly unattainable.

But email subscriptions grew and readership grew – the blog is now read around the world – and such success is even more gratifying than surprising.

So The Ear wants to thank all of his readers and especially his many subscribers as well as the many musicians and presenters who have cooperated and made this endeavor a success.

He has spent the past few days wondering what piece of music he could post that would express his gratitude.

Sad to say, no one piece came to mind.

So he will simply say a huge and heartfelt THANK YOU to all his loyal readers and followers.

He will add that he welcomes comments and suggestions about the contents of the blog and about what piece of music should be posted to celebrate getting 2 million hits!

Again, thank you.

And continued happy reading.


8 Comments »

  1. Appreciate all you do, presuming it’s an unpaid labor of love. I would welcome an occasional book review. I say that because I recently discovered John Suchet’s biographies of Beethoven, Verdi, Mozart and the Strauss “dynasty.” I’ve only read the excellent Verdi bio so far but have the Mozart book in hand.

    Comment by bbead — March 18, 2019 @ 10:09 am

    • Thank you for your reply and fine suggestion.
      It is indeed a labor of love, not a job although it sometimes feels like work.
      I used to do more book reviews, but the concert scene has become overwhelming and so gets priority.
      But I will try to do more book and recording reviews as I have in the past. Usually they occur during slow concert times and around the holidays.
      Best wishes,
      The Ear

      Comment by welltemperedear — March 18, 2019 @ 10:23 am

  2. Much of the great info you provide is ‘after the fact’. Is there a way for me to learn more about these events BEFORE they happen ?

    Comment by Ron Burian — March 18, 2019 @ 9:56 am

    • HI Ron
      Thank you for replying.
      I don’t know when you get or read the postings.
      But almost all the local events are posted BEFORE they occur.
      It used to be an even longer lead time
      but the music scene is so busy today that sometimes it is only a day or two before the event.
      Only reviews and some national or international stories and of course obituaries come after the event.
      You can always check other calendars by going to the home page of the group or individual or checking other media sources.
      Best wishes and thank you for reading the blog.
      Th Ear

      Comment by welltemperedear — March 18, 2019 @ 10:16 am

  3. Hi, Jake! I’ll use this milestone to say thanks ever so much for creating this blog — and it really IS necessary, because the newspapers no longer have the funding to provide information about the wealth of Classical music activities that take place here in Madison. If I had any general suggestion, it would be to provide reviews of the many concerts “under the radar” — the chamber concerts; the choral groups, etc — as opposed to merely indicating the times and dates of performance. The reason I say that is that these concerts seem to have all kinds of adventurous programming by composers the Classical community audience has by and large never heard of — and this healthy trend seems to be on the increase. But again, thanks — and congratulations!

    Comment by Tim Adrianson — March 18, 2019 @ 7:48 am

    • Hi Tim,
      Thank you for your very kind words and loyal reading.
      You are right about the repertoire and programs of many less well known or smaller groups.
      Sorry to say that the scene is so busy today that there isn’t time to do both a preview and review for so many concerts or events.
      That led me a while back to the decision that it better served the artists, the presenters and the public to emphasize previews over reviews.
      I will continue to do what I can, but I see the time crunch only getting even worse.
      It is frustrating for me too, believe me.
      Best wishes,
      Jake

      Comment by welltemperedear — March 18, 2019 @ 10:21 am

  4. If you are really serious about the suggestions (many people who “ask” for them are not), here are some others:

    1. Vary your photographs more. This deficiency has gotten you negative comments from readers other than myself. Photography does take time and effort so maybe you can get others to help you: tell them you are working on a blog story and feel their photos might help spice it up. Most people will have pics. David Ronnis, for instance, has to have more than that electric blue shirt we always see him in!

    2. Don’t have any ‘slack days’ with no news. Perhaps you can develop some easily written ‘filler’ columns for the slow days. Just a “you should listen to this” with a link can do wonders. Slipped Disc’s website (full of what are called on the web “shit postings” ,in my opinion) thrives on this kind of stuff. See it for examples. Insert them when necessary. See also Composer’s Datebook by John Zeck over at Yourclassical.com which has lots of interesting stuff on music. Otherwise, it looks like you either don’t care or are lazy or both.

    3. More interviews with local musicians, groups, professors and the like would be welcome.

    Otherwise, well done and congratulations.

    Comment by fflambeau — March 18, 2019 @ 2:24 am

  5. “…he welcomes comments and suggestions about the contents of the blog….”

    How about a new music reviewer? Someone who actually knows something about music?

    Comment by fflambeau — March 18, 2019 @ 12:44 am


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