The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: A FREE concert of stripped down Opera Scenes takes place this Tuesday night at UW-Madison | November 25, 2019

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By Jacob Stockinger

It has been a busy week for students and staff in the opera program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Mead Witter School of Music.

Last week saw three sold-out and critically acclaimed performances of Benjamin Britten’s opera “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Here is a review: https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2019/11/23/classical-music-university-opera-succeeded-brilliantly-by-staging-brittens-a-midsummer-nights-dream-as-a-pop-project-of-andy-warhol-and-the-factory-in-the-1960s/

This week – on Tuesday night, Nov. 26, at 7:30 p.m. in Music Hall (below) at the foot of Bascom Hill – the UW-Madison Opera Workshop will present a concert that presents a series of stripped down, quasi-staged opera scenes. There is piano accompaniment instead of an orchestra, and sometimes a prop with the suggestion of a costume instead of full costumes and full sets. 

Admission is FREE to the public and no tickets are required.

David Ronis (below top, in a photo by Luke Delalio) and Mimmi Fulmer (below bottom) are the directors, and Ben Hopkins is the Teaching Assistant

No specific roles, arias or works are listed.

But the program features scenes from: “Werther” by the French composer Jules Massenet; “Fidelio” by Ludwig van Beethoven; “Little Women” by  American composer Mark Adamo (below top); “Eugene Onegin” by Russian composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky; “A Little Night Music” by American Broadway composer Stephen Sondheim; “Dead Man Walking” by American composer Jake Heggie (below bottom); and “Hansel and Gretel” by German composer Engelbert Humperdinck.


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2 Comments »

  1. This Smörgåsbord of opera vocals is highly welcome, and a great way to become acquainted with opera.

    Another suggestion to UW Music, why not put together a program of popular orchestral works from operas (minus singing) which would show everyone the importance of the “pit” in operas?

    Here’s a nice Youtube Clip featuring the Italian conductor Gianandrea Noseda (also Conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra) doing just that; he’s.conducting the BBC Philharmonic in the best preludes and overtures from Puccini (the prelude to Act I of Edgar, although little known, is stunning).

    Comment by fflambeau — November 26, 2019 @ 6:18 am

  2. This free price is great for students. Quality music at no cost.

    Hats off to the UW Music School and the Opera/Voice sections.

    Comment by fflambeau — November 25, 2019 @ 4:59 am


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