The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: What composer or piece of music would you like to hear once the coronavirus is contained and concert halls open again? | August 15, 2020

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By Jacob Stockinger

The news can be confusing and even contradictory about some specifics, but the general direction of reports and statistics about the coronavirus pandemic and deaths from COVID-19 is clear.

It is going to be a long haul until we safely get to go hear live music in large crowds again, just as The Ear talked about earlier this week. (Below is a photo of conductor John DeMain and the Madison Symphony Orchestra in Overture Hall.)

Here is a link to that post: https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2020/08/11/classical-music-its-clear-to-the-ear-it-will-be-at-least-another-full-year-before-music-lovers-in-the-u-s-can-safely-attend-live-concerts-what-do-you-think/

When performers finally get to play, and the concert halls finally get to open, and audiences finally get to listen in person, here is what The Ear wants to know:

What composer would you like hear?

Maybe Beethoven (below) because so much of the Beethoven Year – marking the composer’s 250th birthday this coming December – has been canceled or postponed?

Maybe Johann Sebastian Bach (below) because he just seems so basic, varied and universal?

And what specific piece of music would you like to hear?

Perhaps Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony “Choral” with its “Ode to Joy”? Or maybe the “Eroica” Symphony? Or one of the string quartets?

Perhaps the “St. Mathew Passion” or the Mass in B Minor? Maybe one or more of the cantatas?

Should the music pay homage to the suffering, loss and death – perhaps with Mozart’s “Requiem”? Or Brahms’ “A German Requiem”? Or Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony?

Or should the music be upbeat and joyous, like Dvorak’s “Carnival Overture” (below in the YouTube video)? Or some glittering and whirling waltzes by the Strauss family?

Is there an opera that seems especially relevant?

Would you prefer instrumental, choral or vocal music?

And what period, era or style would you prefer?

It will be great to be reacquainted with old and familiar friends. But it would also seem an ideal time to commission and perform new music.

Leave your suggestions in the Comment section with, if possible, a link to a YouTube performance to help us decide.

The Ear wants to hear.

 


Posted in Classical music
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3 Comments »

  1. Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 “Resurrection” would be fitting.

    Comment by Larry Wells — August 15, 2020 @ 1:11 pm

  2. I agree with Jacob. Beethoven. Any of his symphonies. Perhaps the 7th Symphony.

    Comment by John — August 15, 2020 @ 8:34 am

  3. In Bach’s time, the periods of Advent and Lent were designated as ‘Tempus Clausum’ (closed time), during which no concerted music was allowed in the church. This period of musical abstinence made the musical outbursts at Christmas and Easter, complete with trumpet fanfare, that much more glorious. If our current ‘tempus clausum’ ends by next Spring, I think it’d be fitting to do a St. John or Matthew Passion first, and then an Easter Oratorio.

    Comment by Marika Fischer Hoyt — August 15, 2020 @ 12:44 am


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