The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: Here are the top six essays on and writings about classical music – with runners-up — from 2013, as chosen by famed radio station WQXR-FM in New York City. Plus, marimbist Nathaniel Bartlett will perform on Saturday night.

January 3, 2014
1 Comment

ALERT: Madison-born marimba player and composer Nathaniel Bartlett (below, in the setup he will use), who specializes in hi-tech, 3-D computer music and experimental new music, will return from Philadelphia to perform at 8 p.m. on Saturday in the Promenade Hall of the Overture Center. Tickets are $9-$16 at the Overture Center box office (608) 258-4141. The program includes the premiere of his own new work “In Balance”as well as “Vivre” by Allan Schindler, who teaches at the Eastman School of Music. Here is a link for information and tickets:

http://www.nathanielbartlett.com

http://overturecenter.com/production/nathaniel-bartlett-marimba-computer

Nathaniel Bartlett in set up

By Jacob Stockinger

Well, the calendar says it is 2014.

But there is still some unfinished business from 2013 to take care of.

This lag happens almost every year for a couple of reasons.

One is that so many local live music events take place around the holidays – including the concert by the Madison Bach Musicians (below) — and that is where I put my blog’s priority in previews and reviews.

MBM Bach canata 2013 Dec

Another reason is that so much blog space in December is justifiably devoted to holiday gift-giving guides that name the best recordings of the past year as chosen by NPR, The New York Times, The New Yorker magazine and other sources. (Box sets, below, were big this year.) I always hope they are helpful and that putting them in one place makes it easy to follow them.

NPR boxed CD sets

In any case, here is an usual year-end offering that I don’t recall from previous years.

A blog at the famed classical radio station WQXR in New York City put together a list of the best essays and writings about classical music from 2013.

I would tweak it bit and put the memoir-essay by prize-winning pianist and blogger Jeremy Denk (below, in a photo from the MacArthur Foundation) about piano teachers and piano lessons in The New Yorker magazine – it was titled “Every Good Boy Does Fine” — higher up on the list than an Honorable mention. A lot of people take piano lessons — or music lessons some kind — and Denk’s essay was a terrific summing up of what goes into being a great student and a great teacher.

Jeremy Denk, 2013 MacArthur Fellow

But there are a lot of good choices, and – best of all — the blog post provides links so you can read them all at once or parcel them out to, say, one a day.

Anyway, The Ear hopes you enjoy them. The range is terrific from an assessment of Van Cliburn’s early and formative career (below top) asit began while he was a young boy to a piece about Richard Wagner and an African-American opera singer by Alex Ross (below middle). Also included are a piece on orchestras in crisis and two essays about the centennial of composer Benjamin Britten (below bottom).

rememberingcliburn

Alex Ross 2

Benjamin Britten

And if you have any other suggestions to recommend for reading, please leave a comment or send me an email.

http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/top-essays-classical-music-2013/

Despite some severe problems, the state of Classical Music still seems pretty healthy or at leafs not hopeless, judging from this pieces. So here’s looking forward to 2014!

Cheers to you all!


Classical music: Here are some more lists of the Best of 2013 Classical Recordings. They include NPR, Alex Ross and The New Yorker magazine, the San Jose Mercury News and the Star-Ledger of New Jersey.

December 23, 2013
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By Jacob Stockinger

Just like the list of the past year’s best classical recordings (below) from The New York Times, which I posted yesterday and which has a link below, other media outlets are checking in with their lists.

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/classical-music-the-top-classical-recordings-of-2013-are-finally-named-by-the-critics-for-the-new-york-times-does-the-list-come-too-late-to-serve-as-a-holiday-gift-giving-guide/

NY Times top 20 classical CDs 2013 Tony Cenicola for NYT

Here is the list, posted three days ago, of notable local concerts plus great recordings by the acclaimed critic Alex Ross  (below) of The New Yorker magazine:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2013/12/notable-classical-performances-and-recordings-of-2013.html

AlexRoss1

And once again, The Ear has to ask: Why so late? There isn’t much time let to go shopping in local traditional brick-and-mortar stores or even on-line in time for Christmas.

Could it be that the late Thanksgiving threw everyone off?

Are maybe such lists just receiving a lower priority than they used to?

Were reviewers more interested in other things, like the expensive box sets that companies are pushing and they got review copies of?

Or have staff cuts at various newspapers added to the work load and made it more difficult to cover live events and also get out this seasonal features?

The Ear wonders and is waiting to hear some answers from others in the media or from his readers.

In the meantime, here are even some other lists and suggestions from various less well-known sources.

Use them for holiday gifts guide, for others or – at this point in time – for yourself if you receive some gift cards to, say, Barnes and Noble or Amazon.com or Archivmusic.com

Here is one from NPR’’s superb blog “Deceptive Cadence” that lists NPR’s Top Ten classical choices (below) for 2013:

http://www.npr.org/blogs/bestmusic2013/2013/12/13/249751178/npr-classicals-10-favorite-albums-of-2013

NPR 10 best classical cds of 2013

Here is one from the San Jose Mercury-News:

http://www.mercurynews.com/music/ci_24759155/best-2013-classical-hilary-hahns-27-pieces-top

Hilary Hahn Encores CD cover

And here is one from the Star-Ledger in New Jersey.

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/music/index.ssf/2013/12/best_of_2013_classical_music_recordings_and_performances.html

You will notice some crossovers and agreements with NPR. The San Jose Mercury News and The New York Times. That bodes well, it seems to me, and makes the choosing that much easier.

jeremy denk bach golbergs cd

But, as I have said often before, add immensely to the holiday gift by including some tickets to live local concerts – don’t forget that the Madison Symphony Orchestra is offering cut-rate tickets for the rest of the season through midnight of Christmas Eve — and the promise of your companionship and help or assistance.

For more information local concerts, here is a link:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2013/12/21/classical-music-this-holiday-season-why-not-give-the-gift-of-live-music-plus-your-time-and-companionship-here-are-some-suggestions-from-the-ear-and-from-guest-blogger-janet-murphy/

Music, like other forms of art, is a pleasure to be shared and is social in its origins.

Audience attentive


Classical music: What pieces and performers first hooked you on classical music? Here is what hooked critic Anthony Tommasini of The New York Times.

July 20, 2013
23 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

Every once in a while, it’s good to look back and realize with renewed appreciation what pieces and performers first hooked you at a young age on classical music.

That is exactly what Anthony Tommasini (below), the senior music critic for The New York Times, did this past week.

tommasini-190

You could call it nostalgia, but it really was more of a Proustian act of recovering lost time, without a lot of sentimentality but instead with a lot of clear-eyed adult analysis and appreciation.

He was born into a non-musical family, but the young Tommasini nonetheless found himself inexorably drawn toward classical music.

As a young pianist, he got hooked on some unusual repertoire, short pieces that are often overlooked today. Can you guess which pieces by which composer? They might surprise you.

And he favored certain well-known dramatic works by Beethoven (below) especially one particular piano sonata he attempted to play as well as a couple of other sonatas and one of the piano concertos.

Both sets of works, small and large, were performed by two of the Truly Great Pianists of his youth — Arthur Rubinstein and Rudolf Serkin.

Beethoven big

Tommasini also write about his first opera that hooked him for life on opera. Care to guess which one by which composer? And where he heard it?

You may recall that Tommasini, a trained composer, is probably the most respected classical music critic in the U.S. today, along with Alex Ross of The New Yorker magazine.

And local readers may recall when Tommasini (below right) came to Madison to do a residency during the UW-Madison’s centennial celebration of the Pro Arte Quartet two seasons ago. He spoke articulately and passionately at the Wisconsin Union Theater, then did a Q&A with composer William Bolcom (below left) and UW piano professor Todd Welbourne (below middle) before the world-premiere performance of a commissioned work, William Bolcom’s Piano Quintet No. 2, with the Pro Arte Quartet and UW pianist Christopher Taylor:

William Bolcom, Todd Welbourne, Anthony Tommasini

Anyway, here is a link to Tommasini’s story, complete with a terrific and an unexpected anecdote at the end as well as recordings of the specific pieces form his youth that you should listen to:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/18/arts/music/a-critics-ode-to-a-childhood-joy-in-classical-music.html

It wasn’t the first time Tommasini talked about seminal classical works in his past. Here is another that involved Chopin:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/18/arts/music/anthony-tommasinis-musical-moments.html?pagewanted=all

Like Tommasini, I too was given to romantic drama, or even melodrama, as a young person. That, I suspect, is typical. Young people don’t generally first fall in love with the Baroque. I just adored Sergei Rachmaninoff‘s Prelude in C-sharp minor, called “The Bells of Moscow” by its fans and called “It” by Rachmaninoff who grew to detest the popular piece that he was always asked to play as an encore. And I too had to try my hand  or hands at it, to play and perform it. And then it was Rachmanioff’s lush Piano Concerto No. 2 in a great old recording by Arthur Rubinstein and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under Fritz Reiner.

What pieces and performers first hooked you on classical music?

The Ear wants to hear.


Classical music: What were the best recordings of 2012? The critics have had their say. But what about the public? What were the most popular classical recordings of 2012? Ask iTunes and radio station WQXR.

January 10, 2013
3 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

Over the holidays, The Ear offered you a half-dozen or so lists of the Best Classical Recordings of 2012 as chosen by NPR critics, critics for the New York Times, Grammy nominations for 2013 and the New Yorker’s respected critic Alex Ross.

But what were the most popular, the best-selling classical recordings of last year? (Kind of like the 34th annual “People’s Choice Awards” for TV, music and movies that were announced last night. Here is a link to them

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-207_162-57563171/peoples-choice-awards-2013-taylor-swift-glee-stars-win-awards/)

Well, I just read that the top-selling Best Instrumental Album of 2012 digital downloads on iTunes was the debut by Leif-Ove Andsnes’ on Sony with “The Beethoven Journey” featuring the critically acclaimed and also best-selling Norwegian pianist as both soloist and conductor of the Mahler Chamber Orchestra in Beethoven’s Piano Concertos No. 1 in C Major and No. 3 in C Minor. It is well-deserved honor (listen to the YouTube excerpts at the bottom), but there are so many great performances of those great concertos available. Those by Yefim Bronfman and Richard Goode are among The Ear’s favorites. (PS: for more of iTunes favorites, use this link: iTunes Best of 2012)

Andsnes

Leif Ove Andnes Beethoven 1:3 CD

But here is a list as compiled from other sources by the famed New York City classical radio station WQXR. It features actually two lists, one compiled from the station’s own Recording of the Week feature and web traffic, and the other compiled by Billboard magazine, which has a goofy and uneven sense of what constitutes classical music.

Take a look and see what appeals to you and how many of these you added to your own collection – or want to with those post-holiday gift cards and cash.

Also note that the chamber orchestra The Knights (below top) will be appearing in Madison as part of the Wisconsin Union theater series on Feb. 9 with acclaimed pipa player Wu Man (below bottom). (Similarly, pianist-blogger Jeremy Denk, whose Nonesuch debut CD with Beethoven and Ligeti made lists by NPR and Alex Ross, will perform again in Madison for the Wisconsin Union Theater on April 11.)

Here is a link to the WQXR lists of popular classical music:

http://www.wqxr.org/#!/articles/album-week/2012/dec/20/most-popular-classical-albums-2012/

the knights 1

Wu Man 1

And for reference here are the other lists offered by The Ear:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2012/11/ten-notable-classical-music-recordings-of-2012.html

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2012/12/08/classical-music-the-classical-music-nominations-for-the-2013-grammy-awards-can-provide-a-helpful-holiday-gift-shopping-guide-part-1-of-2-plus-the-uw-russian-folk-orchestra-and-madison-handbells-pe/

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2012/12/09/classical-music-the-classical-music-nominations-for-the-2013-grammy-awards-can-provide-a-helpful-holiday-gift-shopping-guide-part-2-of-2/

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/classical-music-here-is-part-2-of-the-ears-holiday-gift-giving-guide-featuring-nprs-top-10-classical-recordings-of-2012/

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2012/12/19/classical-music-here-is-part-4-of-the-ears-holiday-gift-giving-guides-to-classical-music-compliments-of-the-new-york-times/

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2012/12/26/classical-music-got-a-holiday-gift-card-or-christmas-cash-to-spend-here-are-the-choice-picks-of-classical-music-in-2012-with-an-emphasis-on-new-artists-niche-labels-and-smaller-name-perfo/


Classical music: In his new book “Reinventing Bach,” culture critic Paul Elie tracks how music and technology interact through the avatars of Johann Sebastian Bach.

October 13, 2012
5 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

If you are anything like The Ear, you have heard the music of Johann Sebastian Bach in many different forms and for a very long time through many different technologies.

You have heard the music of Bach (below) performed on the organ, the harpsichord, the modern piano and the electronic synthesizer; on string instruments with both gut and steel; in arrangements by winds and brass; in chamber ensembles and in small orchestras; in choirs and with solo vocalists; on vinyl LPs, plastic CD and via digital downloads.

 

And if you are like me, you think that such flexibility is one reason why Johann Sebastian Bach (below) continues to be The Big Bang of Western classical music, a composer of quantity and quality unrivaled by his own contemporaries, his predecessors or his followers.

Some will disagree with that, of course, and argue that it is pointless to argue who is The Best or The No. 1 Composer, when there is so much greatness to choose from.

But even many musicians felt that way. Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Schumann, Chopin, Mendelssohn, Brahms and Mahler all revered Bach.

So what makes Bach’s music so great?

One measure can be found in how it has survived so many different changes of technology and even prospered through that technology to find new audiences and new uses.

Last week, The New York Times’ senior music critic, Anthony Tommasini  (below top) wrote a fine and perceptive story about a new book — the title is “Reinventing Bach” (below bottom) — by award-wnning culture critic Paul Elie that tracks how Bach has survived such changes.

Elie singles out the late pianist Glenn Gould as one of the landmarks of modern Bach interpretations. (At bottom, you can hear Gould’s two entirely different recordings, the first in analogue stereo on vinyl and the second in digital sound issued on a CD,  of the opening aria from Bach’s “Goldberg” Variations.)

It will be interesting to see what other Big Critics – say, Alex Ross of The New Yorker magazine – have to say when they weigh in.

The book by Paul Elie (below), is published by Farrar, Strauss and Giroux – where Elie, who also writes for Commonweal magazine, is an editor — and stands on its own as a recommendation. But with the holiday gift-giving season just around the corner, one can well imagine packaging the book with some wonderful recording of Bach on period instruments or modern instruments, in original version of transcriptions.

Here is a link:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/08/books/reinventing-bach-by-paul-elie.html

What do you think of the main thesis and ideas?

Of J.S. Bach and technology?

The Ear wants to hear.


Classical music: Why are critics picking on the Metropolitan Opera and its general director Peter Gelb, and why is Gelb picking on the critics? Plus the National Memorial Day concert airs tonight on PBS.

May 27, 2012
2 Comments

AN ALERT: Remember to remember. The National Memorial Day Concert, broadcast live from the west lawn of the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., will air tonight on PBS. There won’t be a lot of classical music on the program, but the National Symphony Orchestra will perform. And the broadcast of the concert will be repeated tomorrow night on many PBS channels. What classical music would you like them to perform and do you think it appropriate to remember veterans and mark Memorial Day?

By Jacob Stockinger

In some important ways, this has been a very good year for the Metropolitan Opera’s general director Peter Gelb (below).

He raised a record amount of money for the world’s most famous opera house, and his Met Live in HD broadcasts continue to expand and now reach thousands of movie theaters around the world.

Yet especially when it comes to Robert Lepage’s new production of Richard Wagner’s “Ring” cycle, Gelb has still come in for harsh words from such celebrated critics as Alex Ross of The New Yorker magazine, Anthony Tommasini of The New York Times and Anne Midgette of The Washington Post.

Now, it seems, Opera News has joined the fray.

And Gelb tried fighting back.

Here is link to a roundup of the drama, that latest act, that is threatening to turn the Metropolitan Opera (below) in an opera itself.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/deceptivecadence/2012/05/23/153512997/an-online-debate-of-operatic-intensity-the-met-and-its-critics

But is the Met’s story, and Gelb’s, a comic opera or tragic opera? That is the question.

What do you think?

Do you share the criticism of Gelb?


Classical music: New York Times art critic Roberta Smith praises the Metropolitan Opera’s production of Wagner’s “Ring” cycle by Robert Lepage.

May 22, 2012
1 Comment

By Jacob Stockinger

For many months now – almost two years — The Machine has been the object of scorn by opera buffs.

Many of the nation’s most acclaimed music critics, including Anthony Tommasini of The New York Times and Alex Ross of The New Yorker magazine, have heaped scorn on various aspects of the mammoth, complicated and expensive mechanical set or device (below, in “Das Rheingold”) that director Robert Lepage invented for his production at the Metropolitan Opera of Richard Wagner’s equally mammoth “Ring” cycle.

Some people, including New York Times music critic Zachary Woolfe, have praised aspects of it. And even Tommasini has had some second thoughts.

But the best overall minority report I have seen, the best dissent, if you will, came recently in the form of a perceptive and articulate column and appreciation by New York Times critic Robert Smith (below).

She makes many points, including how the visual aspect of The Machine clarified and reinforced the important plot points and individual characters in the epic four-opera series.

Read it and see what you think:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/14/arts/music/video-as-art-in-lepages-ring-at-the-metropolitan-opera.html?_r=1&ref=richardwagner

What did you think of The Machine?

Did it add to or detract from your appreciation of the Met’s “Ring” cycle and of Wagner?

The Ear wants to hear.


Classical music: 150 years later, do we still not know the real Debussy?

April 5, 2012
10 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

During the past few years we have heard a lot about the anniversaries of Mendelssohn, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann and Mahler. Next year is Wagner.

But this year is a Debussy Year, and we haven’t heard nearly as much, even in anticipation.

That is regrettable.

There is a strong case to be made for Debussy (below) as The Modernist of All Modernists, the man who broke the Germanic strangle hold once and for all on classical music and who pioneering new structure and new harmony.

So far, the best piece I’ve read is this one in the UK’s The Guardian that I have linked to. But I expect to hear much more from such well-known critics as Alex Ross, Anthony Tommasini and Anne Midgette, among others.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/tomserviceblog/2012/mar/29/celebrating-debussys-real-legacy

There is so much Debussy I love, and good Debussy with a strong rhythmic and harmonic  backbone – not just the gauzy focus and slushy sentimentality that we wrongly associate with Impressionism. There is structure and Cartesian rationality and irony galore, as well as a distinctly Gallic subversive sensuality, in Debussy’s work.

I love the solo piano works — the two books of Preludes, the two books of Images, the Estampes, the Suite Bergamasque and the Ile Joyeuse. I love the Violin Sonata and the String Quartet.  I love the orchestral tone poems like Prelude to the Afternoon of a FaunLa Mer and Nocturnes. And I especially adore his “Homage to Rameau” (at bottom, played by Arturo Benedetti Michelangelo).

How would you describe the “real” Debussy”

What are your favorite Debussy works and your favorite Debussy interpreters?

The Ear wants to hear.


Classical music new: When do artistic license and borrowing cross over into being plagiarism and theft? Consider the controversial case of composer Osvaldo Golijov.

March 12, 2012
2 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

Perhaps you are have been following the controversy surrounding the contemporary composer Osvaldo Golijov (below), one of the most frequently performed stars of new music.

Golijov – pronounced GOHL-ee-ov — has been accused stealing music and passing it off as original.

Of course many composers have borrowed many tunes and more from their colleagues, often without crediting them.

But it raises some interesting questions.

Originality is art is a more thorny and complicated issue than it might seem at first. The history of art visual and music and literary, is filled with examples of “borrowings” that some intellectual property lawyers might have a field day with today, After all, it was Pablo Picasso who said, if I recall correctly, I “I don’t borrow, I steal.”

Anyway, here is a story by renowned critic Alex Ross (below) in The New Yorker Magazine’s blog about it:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2012/02/osvaldo-golijov-sidereus.html#ixzz1nEpOkiFe

And here is a story in which Golijov defends himself in an interview to the New York Times critic and writer Daniel J. Wakin:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/08/arts/music/osvaldo-golijov-fracas-over-sidereus-overture.html?_r=2&adxnnl=1&ref=music&pagewanted=1&adxnnlx=1331488937-InbPt36sbeM0dn0WnL/NFw

What do you think about l’affaire Golijov? Or is it Golijov-gate?

If you have an opinion, please share it.

The Ear wants to hear.


Classical music news: For today, Monday, Dec. 26, the web site medici.tv is offering a full day of free viewing.

December 26, 2011
1 Comment

By Jacob Stockinger

Christmas may be over, but there are still important holiday gifts and special deals involving classical music to be had. Here is one as described in a recent press release The Ear received;

The go-to site for experiencing world-class classical performances on the Webmedici.tv – will be offering all music lovers in the U.S. an unlimited free day of viewing on Monday, Dec. 26 of the myriad programs in the site’s pay-per-view library. (A sample is below.)

Much of the live programming on medici.tv is available free throughout the year, but on the day after Christmas, the pay-for-view archival programs will be free, too – as a gift to the site’s fans and new friends.

What’s available on medici.tv now includes more opera than ever before – including acclaimed productions from the UK and Paris with such top stars as Jonas Kaufmann (below), Natalie Dessay and Gerald Finley.

There are also live Webcasts of top-tier orchestral concerts, vocal performances, and chamber recitals, along with vintage documentaries and music films – including the much-lauded Christopher Nupen catalog.

More and more praise accrues to medici.tv with each passing month.

New Yorker magazine writer Alex Ross (below) said on his blog, “The Rest Is Noise,” that “the hits keep coming at medici.tv.” Offering “treasures aplenty” was how Gramophone editor-in-chief James Jolly put it, designating medici.tv as one of the Web’s leading classical experiences.

The medici.tv app for iPads, iPhones, and other digital devices – available for free at the Apple app store – was named one of the top five apps for classical music by WQXR, the classical music station of New York City.

In addition to its live webcasts, medici.tv also offers an extensive library of video-on-demand programs, available via subscription. These performances, documentaries and archival features spotlight leading musical institutions and world-class artists – from golden-age legends to today’s top stars.

The 30-plus Christopher Nupen films available at medici.tv include not only the priceless du Pré documents (complete with Elgar’s Cello Concerto and a number of all-star chamber performances) but also films of Evgeny Kissin, Vladimir Ashkenazy and Nathan Milstein. All 32 Beethoven piano sonatas recorded by Daniel Barenboim (below) in 1983-84 will be available by the year’s end.

About medici.tv: Since its official launch in May 2008, medici.tv has gained international recognition, bringing together a community of music and arts lovers from 182 countries – online viewers who have watched over 12 million videos to date. The site currently averages more than 80,000 individual visitors each month.

In addition to offering live concert hall events that music lovers can experience on their computers and entertainment systems, medici.tv now offers a free application (available at the Apple App Store) that makes it possible to experience world-class artistry on iPads and iPhones.

Building on the success of webcasts from the Verbier Festival (below) in 2007, medici.tv has offered high-definition webcasts from many other leading festivals, including Aix-en-Provence, Saint-Denis, Aspen, Glyndebourne, Salzburg, and Lucerne; from such Parisian venues as the Opéra National de Paris, Auditorium du Louvre, Cité de la Musique, and Salle Pleyel; and from Milan’s famed La Scala.

Many operas and concerts performed by the world’s top artists and orchestras have been webcast as live events and later as video-on-demand (VOD) – all available for free. The list of artists presented at medici.tv is a “who’s who” of today’s stars, including Claudio Abbado, Martha Argerich, Daniel Barenboim, Pierre Boulez, Plácido Domingo, John Eliot Gardiner, Valery Gergiev, Bernard Haitink, Riccardo Muti (below), Anna Netrebko, Maurizio Pollini, Thomas Quasthoff and Simon Rattle.

Among the featured orchestras are such renowned ensembles as the Berlin Philharmonic, Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw (below), Orchestre National de France, Orchestre de Paris, Filarmonica della Scala, and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe.

In addition to webcasts of more than 80 live concerts each year, medici.tv has partnered with the world’s top artists and music institutions to offer subscriptions, giving music-lovers the opportunity to watch more than 700 Video On Demand programs – growing to 1,000 programs over the next two years.

They include concerts, operas, recitals, documentaries, master classes, artist portraits, and archival material. Featured artists include such legendary musicians as Leonard Bernstein, Maria Callas, Glenn Gould, Herbert von Karajan, Yehudi Menuhin, David Oistrakh, Sviatoslav Richter, Mstislav Rostropovich, Arthur Rubinstein (below), Georg Solti and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, as well as such leading film directors as Bruno Monsaingeon, Paul Smaczny and Frank Scheffer.

You can watch medici.tv concerts on iPhone with the free medici.tv App.

You can also:

Follow medici.tv on Facebook!

Follow medici.tv on Twitter!

Follow medici.tv on YouTube!


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