The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: A FREE Intergenerational Choir concert this Saturday night will bring voices of teens and seniors together at the Capitol Lakes Retirement Community

March 11, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

On this Saturday night, March 12, at 7 p.m. the MYC Intergenerational Choir — composed of high school-aged singers of Madison Youth Choirs and residents of Capitol Lakes Retirement Community — will present their fourth concert performance since the ensemble’s creation in January 2015.

Intergeneration Choir

This unique artistic collaboration, led by Madison Youth Choirs conductor Lisa Kjentvet (below) — who is a graduate of the UW-Madison — and featuring performers who range from 15 to 93 years old, celebrates the power of creative expression at every age.

Lisa Kjentvet

The Intergenerational Choir will present a varied program, including works by Henry Purcell, William Billings, Bob Dylan and a selection of traditional Irish tunes.

Here are the specific works:

Welcome, Every Guest…………Traditional shape-note canon
Come, Ye Sons of Art……………Henry Purcell
When Jesus Wept………………William Billings
Danny Boy……………………….Frederic Weatherly
When Irish Eyes Are Smiling….Chauncey Olcott, George Graff, Jr. and Ernest Ball
Blessing…………………………Katie Moran Bart
Forever Young………………….Bob Dylan

The concert is in the Capitol Lakes Grand Hall (below), 333 West Main Street. Off the Capitol Square. Admission is FREE and open to the public.

Capitol Lakes Hall

The choir is supported in part by a grant from the John A. Johnson Foundation, a component fund of the Madison Community Foundation.

Here is more information about the Madison Youth Choirs (MYC): Recognized as an innovator in youth choral music education, Madison Youth Choirs (MYC) welcomes singers of all ability levels, annually serving more than 1,000 young people, ages 7-18, through a wide variety of choral programs in our community.

Cultivating a comprehensive music education philosophy that inspires self-confidence, personal responsibility, and a spirit of inquiry leading students to become “expert noticers,” MYC creates accessible, meaningful opportunities for youth to thrive in the arts and beyond.

For more information, visit www.madisonyouthchoirs.org or call (608) 238-7464.

 


Classical music: The Madison Youth Choirs’ Winter Concerts this Sunday will explore links between science and music. Plus, the UW Wind Ensemble performs a FREE concert Thursday night.

December 10, 2015
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ALERT: Thursday night at 7:30 p.m. in Mills Hall, the UW Wind Ensemble will perform a FREE concert. The program features “Concerto X” by Scott McAllister with clarinet soloist Wesley Warnhoff, adjunct professor of clarinet. It is a work based on grunge music that was born in the heavy metal music of the late 80s and early 90s, including a melody from Nirvana’s “Where Did You Sleep Last Night?” Also on the program is “In Wartime” by David Del Tredici, which was inspired by the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001; and the Second Suite in F Major for Military Band by Gustav Holst.

By Jacob Stockinger

A friend at Madison Youth Choirs writes:

On this Sunday, Dec. 13, the young singers of Madison Youth Choirs (MYC, seen below at the Winter Concert last year) will present the 2015 Winter Concert Series, “Inquiry: Science, Music, Imagination” at First Congregational United Church of Christ in Madison, 1609 University Avenue, near Camp Randall.

Madison Youth Choirs Winter Concert 2014

Over 14 weeks of rehearsals in preparation for the concerts, the 330 young vocalists (ages 7-18) in MYC’s nine performing choirs have been learning to use the tools of observation, experimentation, and analysis to reach a deeper understanding of their choral repertoire.

Students have also begun to recognize the role that resilience plays in both scientific and musical fields, learning how to work through moments of frustration and uncertainty to reach new discoveries.

The choirs will perform a varied program, including works by Benjamin Britten, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Vincent Persichetti; a Peruvian lament, a Spanish villancico, and a newly-created arrangement of the oldest-known surviving English song.

Tickets for each of the three concerts (high school ensembles at 1:30 p.m., boychoirs at 4 p.m., girlchoirs at 7 p.m.) will be $10 for general admission, $5 for students age 7-18 and free for children under 7.

Audience members will need a separate ticket for each concert.

Here is the schedule:

1:30 p.m. High School Ensembles featuring a guest appearance by the MYC-Capitol Lakes Intergenerational Choir

4 p.m. Boychoirs

7 p.m. Girlchoirs

Tickets available at the door, $10 for general admission, $5 for students 7-18, and free for children under 7

This concert is generously endowed by the Diane Ballweg Performance Fund with additional support from the American Girl’s Fund for Children, BMO Harris Bank, the Madison Community Foundation, and the Wisconsin Arts Board. 

Here is a repertoire list for the programs:

1:30 p.m. Concert (Featuring High School Ensembles)

Cantilena

Bel Tempo Che Vola ……………….Jean Baptiste Lully

Weep No More………………………..David Childs

Songbird…………………………………Sarah Quartel

Sound the Trumpet………………….Henry Purcell

When I Set Out for Lyonesse……Keith Bissell

Ragazzi (below in a photo by Karen Holland)

Regina Coeli (sung in Italian)……Gregorian chant, ca. 10th century

Regina Coeli (sung in Italian)……Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina

Song of Peace……………………………Vincent Persichetti

Dulaman (sung in Gaelic) …………Michael McGlynn

Madison Youth Choirs Ragazzi cr Karen Holland

Cantabile

Utopia………………………………………………………..Moira Smiley

Lacrimoso son io (K. 555, sung in Italian)…….Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

The Gods Have Heard My Vows…………………….Thomas Weelkes

Palomita……………………………………………………..Traditional Peruvian lament

Hoj, hura, hoj!………………………………………………………..Omar Macha

Madison Youth Choirs Cantabile

Cantabile and Ragazzi

Apple-Tree Wassail………………………Stephen Hatfield

MYC/Capitol Lakes Intergenerational Choir and Combined Choirs

Forever Young……………………………..Bob Dylan

4 p.m. Concert (Featuring Boychoirs)

Combined boychoirs, Purcell, Britten, Holst, Ragazzi

Intonent Hodie…………………………………..Anonymous (probably 12th century)

Sainte Nicholaes (sung in Latin)…………..Godric of Finchale

Purcell

Singt den Herrn (sung in German)…Michael Praetorius

Who Can Sail……………………………..Norwegian Folk Song, Arr. Jeanne Julseth-Heinrich

Rolling Down to Rio……………………Edward German

Britten (below with Purcell Choir in a photo by Karen Holland)

Rattlesnake Skipping Song……Derek Holman

Tit-for-Tat…………………………….Benjamin Britten

Jerusalem……………………………..Sir Hubert Parry, poem by William Blake

Madison Youth Purcell and Britten Choirs cr Karen Holland

Holst (below with Pucell and Britten choirs in a photo by Karen Holland)

Riu Riu Chiu (sung in Spanish)….Anonymous, from Villancicos de diversos Autores

Anima Mea (sung in Latin)……….Michael Praetorius

The Sound of Silence…………………Paul Simon

Ragazzi

Regina Coeli (sung in Italian)………Gregorian chant, ca. 10th century

Regina Coeli (sung in Italian)………Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina

Song of Peace……………………………..Vincent Persichetti

Dulaman (sung in Gaelic) ……………Michael McGlynn

Combined boychoirs, Purcell, Britten, Holst, Ragazzi

Hava Nashira (sung in Hebrew)……….Traditional Hebrew canon

Madison Youth Choirs boychoirs Purcell, Britten and Holst CR Karen Holland

7 p.m. Concert (Featuring Girlchoirs)

Choraliers

Hava Nashira (sung in Hebrew)……….Traditional Hebrew canon

You’ll Never Guess What I Saw………….Ruth Watson Henderson

Suo Gan…………………………………..Welsh Lullaby, Arr. by Alec Rowley

Tailor of Gloucester…………………..English Folk Song, Arr. by Cyndee Giebler

Con Gioia (below in a photo by Karen Holland)

Donkey Carol………………………….John Rutter

Mid-Winter…………………………….Bob Chilcott

Fancie……………………………………Benjamin Britten

Madison Youth Choirs Con Gioia Karen Holland

Capriccio (below in a photo by Mike Ross)

Sound the Trumpet………………………………Henry Purcell

An die Musik (D. 547, sung in German, heard at bottom in a YouTube video with soprano Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and pianist Gerald Moore)…..Franz Schubert

Palomita (sung in Spanish)……Traditional Peruvian lament, Arr. by Randal Swiggum

Niska Banja………………………….Serbian Gypsy Dance, Arr. by Nick Page

Madison Youth Choir Capriccio CR Mike Ross

About the Madison Youth Choirs (MYC): Recognized as an innovator in youth choral music education, Madison Youth Choirs (MYC) welcomes singers of all ability levels, annually serving more than 1,000 young people, ages 7-18, through a wide variety of choral programs in our community. Cultivating a comprehensive music education philosophy that inspires self-confidence, personal responsibility and a spirit of inquiry leading students to become “expert noticers,” MYC creates accessible, meaningful opportunities for youth to thrive in the arts and beyond.


Classical music: A FREE community hymn sing is Saturday at 11 a.m. in Overture Hall. Plus, Edgewood College’s annual FREE fall choral concert is this Sunday afternoon.

October 16, 2015
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ALERT: Going to the Dane County Farmers’ Market on this UW-Madison Homecoming Weekend? A FREE community hymn sing will be held this Saturday, Oct. 17, at 11 a.m. in Overture Hall of the Overture Center. The event is presented by the Madison Symphony Orchestra and lasts about 45 minutes. MSO organist Samuel Hutchison (below) will be at the keyboard of the Overture Concert Organ.

For more information about future hymn sings, visit:

http://madisonsymphony.org/hymnsings

Sam Hutchison with organ (c) JoeDeMaio

By Jacob Stockinger

Edgewood College in Madison will present a fall choral concert this Sunday afternoon, Oct. 18, at 2:30 p.m. in St. Joseph Chapel, 1000 Edgewood College Drive.

Admission is FREE.

Edgewood Chamber Singers

The Edgewood Chamber Singers, performing under the direction of Sergei Pavlov (below top), will be joined by the Women’s Choir, under the direction of Kathleen Otterson (below top).

Sergei Pavlov

Kathleen Otterson 2

Included on the Women’s Choir program are works by Henry Purcell, Russian and Korean folk music, and a spiritual.

The Chamber Singers will perform works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Franz Schubert, Sergei Taneyev and Segundo Condor.

 


Classical music: The Token Creek Festival celebrates Wisconsin poet Lorine Niedecker this Tuesday afternoon and evening with a forum, a picnic and a recital.

August 23, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Ear’s friends at the Token Creek Festival write:

On this Tuesday, August 25, the Token Creek Festival shines a lens on one of Wisconsin’s most important artists: the American poet Lorine Niedecker (1903-1970), whose recognition and appreciation have been delayed until recently.

Many poets of the 20th century have worked in what is broadly known as the Imagist mode: short lines, brief phrases, elusively stated thoughts. At its most eloquent it can give us the great range and imagination of William Carlos Williams, as well as decades of other very convincingly compressed writers from Emily Dickinson through Gary Snyder.

lorine niedecker

In Lorine Niedecker we feel the pressure of what has been left out, the hard journey to final shape. We infer a “story” behind it, and we marvel at the courage and art that set it down so briefly.

We can also admire the persistence that drove her to continue to write all through her life, when she received little support or recognition. Niedecker cleaned hospital rooms, and hung barely above the poverty level throughout her life, which she led mainly in a cottage on Blackhawk Island (below) near Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. (You can hear a reading of her poem “My Life by Water” in a YouTube video at the bottom.)

Niedecker cottage Blackhawk Island

According to Ann Engelman, president of the Friends of Lorine Niedecker, she “has been called the poet of place because her imagery is so grounded in the area where she lived. Basil Bunting called her “the Emily Dickinson of this century.”

As an objectivist poet, the simplicity of her images helps us sense our own experiences with the elements around us.” Niedecker (below, in a photo from her later years, courtesy of the Poetry Foundation) had a strange life that included a truncated college education and long stretches of isolation as well as an extended epistolary (and, briefly, physical) friendship with fellow poet Louis Zukofsky; her existence resonates in her verse.

lorine niedecker poetry foundation

Three years ago the Token Creek Festival began a concerted look at the land where the festival takes place (below, in a photo by Jess Anderson), exploring intersections between art and nature. The theme continues in the multi-part Niedecker-inspired event, “Paean to Place,” on this Tuesday.

Token Creek land:barn Jess Anderson

Here is a schedule:

  • 4 p.m. Forum. “Finding Lorine Niedecker” will introduce the poet through audio and video footage. A wide-ranging conversation between biographer Margot Peters and composer John Harbison will explore Niedecker’s work, and the event will conclude with performances of music inspired by, or settings of, her evocative texts.
  • 6 p.m. Picnic. Festival attendees are invited to a first -ever Token Creek picnic at the farm—an elegant feast of savory summer fare.
  • 7:30 p.m. Recital: “Longing for Place.” Pianist Ryan McCollough and soprano Lucy Fitz Gibbon are two outstanding performers who represent their own youthful generation, searching for what is best and most characteristic in the work of their time. In 2015 our relationship to the natural world is even more fragile and elusive than it was to Lorine Niedecker. Still artists seek to frame that relationship, and render it with their new developing languages.

McCullough and Fitz Gibbon’s recital on themes of nature and place and longing includes works by Henry Purcell, Kaija Saariaho, Nicholas Vines and Robert Schumann, as well as new song cycles by John Harbison — a co-founder and co-director of the Token Creek Festival — and Niccolo Athens.

Harbison’s settings of Niedecker poems, commissioned by the Boston Symphony’s Tanglewood Music Festival and premiered there this summer, “let the words speak clearly, syllable by syllable, but he adds expressive space into the texts’ phrases and expands its melodic contours, heightening the sense of the poems being mediums of internal, very personal, monolog” (from the Tanglewood program booklet, July 2015).

Ryan McCullough with piano

Lucy Fitz Gibbon

“Paean to Place” is presented in collaboration with the Friends of Lorine Niedecker, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.

Tickets are $15-$30 (students $10). Packages are available.

Tickets can be purchased by using the order form at the Token Creek website www.tokencreekfestival.org, by phone at 608-241-2525, by email at info@tokencreekfestival.org, or by U.S. mail at P.O. Box 5201, Madison WI, 53705.

TokenCreekentrance

Performances take place at the Festival Barn, on Highway 19 near the hamlet of Token Creek (10 minutes north of Madison) with ample parking available. The concert venue (below), indoors and air-conditioned, is invitingly small—early reservations are recommended.

TokenCreekentrance

TokenCreekbarn interior

More information about the Token Creek Festival and all events can be found at the website, http://www.tokencreekfestival.org or by calling 608-241-2525.


Classical music: The Madison Chamber Choir will perform Menotti’s madrigal fable “The Unicorn, the Gorgon and the Manticore” this Friday night. On Tuesday night, The Empire Brass and organist Douglas Major perform at the Overture Center.

May 11, 2015
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A REMINDER: Tomorrow night, Tuesday, May 12, at 7:30 p.m, in Overture Hall at the Overture Center, the Empire Brass (below left) will perform a mostly Baroque program with guest organist Douglas Major (below right). Composers on the program include Johann Sebastian Bach, Dietrich Buxtehude, Henry Purcell and Michael Praetorius. Here is link to the Madison Symphony Orchestra‘s website with the complete program and background information:

http://www.madisonsymphony.org/empire

Empire BRrass with Douglas Major

By Jacob Stockinger

Larger groups and presenters such as the Madison Symphony Orchestra , the Madison Opera, the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, the Wisconsin Union Theater, Edgewood College and the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music and the University Opera have finished their concert seasons.

Soon the major summer events — the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society, the Madison Early Music Festival, the Token Creek Chamber Music Festival and  Opera in the Park — will take place.

But not before smaller groups, who are still winding up their season, have finished.

The Ear has received the follow announcement:

Dear Friends,

I’d like to make you aware of an upcoming concert by the Madison Chamber Choir (below).

The concert is this Friday night, May 15, at 7:30 p.m., in Christ Presbyterian Church, 944 East Gorham Street, in downtown Madison.

Admission is a $10 suggested donation.

Madison Chamber Choir 1 BIGGER

The program features “The Unicorn, the Gorgon and the Manticore” by the Italian-American composer Gian Carlo Menotti (below), most famous perhaps for establishing the Spoleto Festival and for his Christmas TV opera “Amahl and the Night Visitors.” You can hear excerpts from the “Unicorn” in a YouTube video at the bottom.

The work is described as a “madrigal fable about an odd poet his strange pets and the shallow whims of his faddish neighbors.” Assorted guest chamber instrumentalists will join the choir for the cantata.

Gian Carlo Menotti

The artistic director of the Madison Chamber Choir is Albert Pinsonneault (below), who also teaches at Edgewood College and directs the Madison Choral Project.

Albert Pinsonneault 2

Here is a link to the choir’s website about the concert:

http://www.madisonchamberchoir.net/performances/

And here is a link to a sample of the choir’s singing:

http://www.madisonchamberchoir.net/media/

Menotti poster


Classical music: Virtuoso trumpeter and Empire Brass founder Rolf Smedvig dies suddenly at 62. The Empire Brass plays with the Overture Center Concert Organ on Tuesday, May 12.

May 2, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

Rolf Smedvig, the Norwegian-Icelandic trumpeter extraordinaire, died suddenly this past week at age 62, apparently of a heart attack.

Once the young principal trumpet of the Boston Symphony and renowned soloist, he also cofounded and played with the Empire Brass.

rolf smedvig

Passing along the news seems especially timely and appropriate since the Empire Brass will perform in Overture Hall at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 12.

Tickets are $20. Call the Overture Center box office at (608) 258-4141.

Empire Brass

The brass ensemble will perform with organist Douglas Major (below top), former organist at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C.,  at the console of the Overture Center Concert Organ (below bottom).

Douglas Major

Overture Concert Organ overview

The program is a delightfully and largely Baroque one, which should highlight the brass sound. It features music by Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Tomaso Albinoni, Georg Philipp Telemann, Johann Pachelbel and Dietrich Buxtehude and Henry Purcell. (You can hear the Empire Brass, with Rolf Smedvig, performing Handel’s “Water Music” in a YouTube video at the bottom.)

But one wonders: Is there a substitute for Rolf Smedvig? Or has the brass group changed its membership since the publicity photo? It sounds like the latter is the case, but The Ear doesn’t know for sure. Do you?

Here is a link for more information about the Madison concert:

http://www.madisonsymphony.org/empire

Here is a link to a terrific obituary and feature profile done by Tm Huizenga for the Deceptive Cadence blog on National Public Radio (NPR).

http://www.npr.org/blogs/deceptivecadence/2015/04/28/402836867/dazzling-trumpeter-rolf-smedvig-dies-suddenly

 

 


Classical music: Classical-rock hybrid group Red Priest plays the music of Bach, Vivaldi, Handel and Purcell in Edgerton this Saturday night.

November 6, 2014
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By Jacob Stockinger

To be honest, The Ear is not sure this event really belongs on this blog, which is devoted to classical music.

But it is a dilemma. After all, what do you say when the program includes music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, George Frideric Handel, Henry Purcell and other Baroque composers?

So I will let readers decide.

Here is a press release from our friends at the Edgerton Performing Arts Center where at 7:30 p.m. this Saturday night, there will be a performance by the crossover group Red Priest (below top) – which was the actual nickname of Antonio Vivaldi (below bottom), who had red hair and was a Roman Catholic priest in Venice as well as a composer famous for his string music and concertos.

Red Priest in 2011 w.harpsichord

vivaldi

Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door.

The concert will feature a double manual harpsichord that belongs to First Unitarian Society of Madison. It is a magnificent looking and sounding 18th-century style French double concert quality instrument.

Here is a link to the Edgerton Performing Arts Center’s website where can find information including directions.

http://www.edgerton.k12.wi.us/EPAC.cfm?subpage=1220658

And here is the PRESS RELEASE: “Red Priest is the only early music group in the world to have been compared by the press to the Rolling Stones, Jackson Pollock, the Marx Brothers, Spike Jones, and the Cirque du Soleil. “Rock-chamber concert approach to early music.” (A sample of Red Priest’s Vivaldi can be heard in a YouTube video at the bottom.)

“Red Priest will “rock” the stage performing early music works from great composers such as Bach and Vivaldi.

“Red Priest has redefined the art of period performance, creating a virtual orchestra through their creative arrangements and performance from memory with swashbuckling virtuosity, heart-on-sleeve emotion and compelling stagecraft.

Performers are: Piers Adams on recorders; David Greenberg on the violin;
 Angela East on the cello; and
 David Wright on the harpsichord.

Red_Priest_dancing (1)

For more information, visit the Website: www.redpriest.com

“Tickets are available at the Edgerton Pharmacy, Edgerton Piggly Wiggly, in Janesville at Knapton Musik Knotes and Voigt Music Center, and by calling (608) 561-6093.  Online at iTickets.com fees apply.

“All performances funded by the William and Joyce Wartmann Endowment for the Performing Arts.”

“Here is the program for “Viva Baroque”:

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH (1685-1750): Preludio

GIOVANNI PAULO CIMA (c.1570-1622) / DARIO CASTELLO (c.1590-c.1630):  Two Sonatas in “Stile Moderno”

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH:  “Bach on A” — Arioso – Bourrée – Sarabande – Gigue

GEORGE FRIDERICK HANDEL (1685-1759):  Recorder Sonata in B Minor Largo – Vivace – Furioso – Adagio – Alla Breve

ANTONIO VIVALDI (1678-1741): Concerto in F major: “L’Autunno” (Autumn, from The Four Seasons)                   Allegro (Dancing Drunkards) – Adagio molto (Sleeping Drunkards) – Allegro (Autumn Hunt)

ANTONIO VIVALDI:  Concerto in F minor: “L’Inverno” (Winter, from The Four Seasons):                 Allegro non molto (Bitter Frostbite and Winds) – Largo (Peaceful by the Fire with Rain Outside) –  Allegro (Ice Skating and Freezing Wind)

GEORGE FRIDERICK HANDEL:  Aria in D major

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH/O’CAROLAN/DOW/TRAD (arr. GREENBERG):  “Bach on G” —                   Prelude – Allegro – Poppy Leaf Hornpipe – The Princess Royal Hornpipe I & II – Miss Charters’ Reel

HENRY PURCELL (1659-1695) / MAURIZIO CAZZATI (1620-1677) / DIEGO ORTIZ (1580):  A Suite of Grounds

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH:   Toccata and Fugue in D minor


Classical music education: The Madison Youth Choirs perform the 11th Annual Spring Concert Series this Sunday afternoon and night. They will premiere a new work about Shakespeare’s “Macbeth by UW-Madison alumnus Scott Gendel.

May 14, 2014
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By Jacob Stockinger

On this Sunday afternoon and evening, May 18, 2014, the Madison Youth Choirs (MYC, below) will ends the celebration of their 10th anniversary and celebrate the return of spring with a lively concert series featuring several groups whose membership total over 300 talented young singers.

madison youth choirs

All concerts will take place in the Capitol Theater of the Overture Center for the Arts in downtown Madison.

Tickets are $10-$20, and can be purchased in three ways:

1. online at www.overturecenter.com

2. By phone at (608) 258-4141

3. In person at the Overture Center box office, 201 State St., Madison, Wisconsin.

Throughout this season, focused on the theme “Arts & Minds,” MYC’s singers have discovered connections between visual and vocal expressions of human creativity, using both mediums as a lens to explore the world.

Concert selections will include works from a wide variety of musical eras and cultures, including classical pieces by Bach and Vivaldi, traditional folk songs in Hebrew and Japanese, and contemporary pieces by Cindy Lauper and Eric Whitacre (below), creator of the “Virtual Choir,” which has become a global phenomenon on YouTube.

Composer conductor Eric Whitacre, in rehearsal and concert at Union Chapel, Islington, London

MYC’s boychoirs will make history with the world premiere of University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music alumnus Scott Gendel’s “Sound and Fury,” featuring text from Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.”

This ambitious new work by Gendel  will be a fitting prelude to the boychoirs’ upcoming summer tour to Scotland, where they will perform in the invitation-only Aberdeen International Youth Festival (below).

Aberdeen International Youth Festival Opeing Ceremony

For more information about Scott Gendel, visit:

http://scottgendel.com

Scott Gendel color headshot

Continuing its commitment to celebrating the work of outstanding local music teachers, MYC will also present the Music Educator of the Year Award to Jan Vidruk. Ms. Vidruk (below center ) is a nationally recognized leader in early childhood education who has inspired young people in music and movement classes for over 40 years.

Jan Vidruk (center)

Here is the Concert Information, Schedules and Programs for Sunday, May 18, 2014

1 p.m. – Choraliers (below in a photo by Cynthia McEahern

Hashivenu…Traditional Hebrew

Bee! I’m Expecting You… Emma Lou Diemer

Ae Fond Kiss… Traditional Scottish, arr. Kesselman

The Duel… Paul Bouman

Kojo no Tsuki… Traditional Japanese, arr. Snyder

Madison Youth Choirs Choraliers CR Cynthia McEahern

Con Gioia (below in a photo by Karen Holland)

For the Beauty of the Earth… John Rutter

The Jabberwocky… Jennings

Tres Cantos Nativos dos Indios Krao… Leite

Annie Laurie… arr. Rentz

Madison Youth Choirs Con Gioia Karen Holland

Capriccio (below in a photo by Mike Ross)

Hark! The Echoing Air… Henry Purcell

Hotaru Koi… Ro Ogura

The Seal Lullaby… Eric Whitacre

Niska Banja… Traditional Serbian, arr. Nick Page

Madison Youth Choir Capriccio CR Mike Ross

4 p.m.: Purcell

Gloria Tibi (from Mass)… Leonard Bernstein

Simple Gifts… Traditional

Orpheus with his Lute… Ralph Vaughan Williams

Laudamus Te (from Gloria in D Major)… Antonio Vivaldi

Britten

The Lord Bless You and Keep You … John Rutter

Er Kennt die rechten Freudenstuden … Johann Sebastian Bach

Holst

The Bird…William Billings

The Cowboy Medley…arr. R. Swiggum

Anthem (from Chess)…Anderson/Ulveas, arr. R. Swiggum

Ragazzi  (below in a photo by Dan Sinclair)

dominic has a doll… Vincent Persichetti

Si, Tra i Ceppi… George Frideric Handel

Fair Phyllis… John Farmer

Madison Youth Choirs Ragazzi HS CR Dan Sinclair

Madison Boychoir (Purcell, Britten, Holst — below in a photo by Karen Holland — and Ragazzi combined)

Sound and Fury (world premiere)… Scott Gendel, text from Macbeth

Will the Circle Be Unbroken?… Traditional, arr. R. Swiggum

Madison Youth Choirs boychoirs Purcell, Britten and Holst CR Karen Holland

7:30 p.m. High School Ensembles

Cantilena

How Merrily We Live… Michael Este

Salut Printemps… Claude Debussy

Hope… Andrew Lippa

Hope is the Thing… Emma Lou Diemer

Ragazzi

dominic has a doll… Vincent Persichetti

Si Tra i Ceppi… George Frideric Handel

Fair Phyllis I Saw Sitting…John Farmer

Cantabile

Cruel, You Pull Away Too Soon… Thomas Morley

Chiome d’Oro… Claudio Monteverdi

Mountain Nights… Zoltan Kodaly

Las Amarillas…Stephen Hatfield

Time After Time… Cyndi Lauper, arr. Michael Ross

Cantabile and Ragazzi

Come Thou Fount of Ever Blessing…arr. Mack Wilberg

A Hymn for St. Cecilia…Herbert Howells (heard at bottom in a YouTube video)

This project is supported by American Girl’s Fund for Children, the Pleasant T. Rowland Foundation, the Kenneth A. Lattman Foundation, American Family Insurance, Dane Arts with additional funds from the Evjue Foundation, charitable arm of The Capital Times, and BMO Harris Bank. This project is also supported in part by a grant from the Wisconsin Arts Board with funds from the state of Wisconsin and the National Endowment for the Arts.

ABOUT THE MADISON YOUTH CHOIRS (MYC)

Recognized as an innovator in youth choral education, MYC inspires enjoyment, learning, and social development through the study and performance of high-quality and diverse choral literature. The oldest youth choir organization in Wisconsin, MYC welcomes singers of all ability levels, challenging them to learn more than just notes
and rhythms. Singers explore the history, context, and heart of the music, becoming “expert noticers,” using music as a lens to discover the world. MYC serves more than 500 young people, ages 7-18, in 11 single-gender choirs.

In addition to a public concert series, MYC conducts an annual spring tour of schools and retirement centers, performing for more than 7,000 students and senior citizens annually. MYC also collaborates with professional arts organizations including the Madison Symphony Orchestra, Madison Ballet, and Madison Opera, while continually supporting and recognizing the work of public schools and music educators throughout the area.

In summer 2014, MYC boychoirs will travel to Scotland for their first appearance at the invitation-only Aberdeen International Youth Festival.

For further information about attending or joining, visit  http://www.madisonyouthchoirs.org       contact the 
Madison Youth Choirs at info@madisonyouthchoirs.org, or call (608) 238-7464

 

 

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Classical music: The Madison Choral Project celebrates the holidays and the winter solstice with “A Light in the Darkness” concert this Saturday night.

December 19, 2013
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By Jacob Stockinger

The recently formed Madison Choral Project (below) will perform “A Light in the Darkness” concert this Saturday night at 7 p.m. in the First Congregational Church, 1609 University Ave., that features traditional holiday music combined with secular pieces focusing on the theme of light and darkness to mark the winter solstice — which falls on the same Saturday.

Madison Choral Project color

Perhaps Madison’s newest choral ensemble, the Madison Choral Project, is a fully professional 17-voice ensemble, under the direction of Dr. Albert Pinsonneault (below), who teaches and conducts at Edgewood College. You can hear the new choral group performing a work from Felix Mendelssohn‘s oratorio “Elijah” live in a concert this past May in a YouTube video at the bottom.

Albert Pinsonneault 2

MCP is a professional chamber choir dedicated to bringing international-caliber choral performances to southern Wisconsin.

Along with spoken texts, narrated by Noah Ovshinsky (below), assistant news director of Wisconsin Public Radio, the evening weaves together an eclectic range of old and new designed to be both balm and hope, joy and inspiration, on the darkest day of the year, December 21, the Winter Solstice.

Noah Ovshinsky

A world premiere performance (of a work by David Evan Thomas, below (will be featured among favorite composers such as Herbert Howells, Henry Purcell, Charles Ives, Sergei Rachmaninoff, and Moses Hogan. (Update: The world premiere of a new work by Madison composer Jerry Hui has been taken off the program.)

Tickets are $20 general admission and $5 for students (with valid ID), and can be purchased online at www.themcp.org or at the concert.

David Evan Thomas

The program, arranged into four groups, includes:

Long, Long Ago (Herbert Howells)
; Silent Night (arr. Malcolm Sargent); 
Angels We Have Heard on High (arr. Matthew Culloton)
; Hear My Prayer (Henry Purcell); 
The Celestial Country: Double Chorus A Cappella (Charles Ives)

Prepare the Way (arr. Margareta Jalkeus); A Christmas Carol (Charles Ives)
; In Dulci Jublio (arr. Matthew Culloton); Jingle Bells (arr. David Moore)

“From Light to Light: Earth” by J. Aaron McDermid; and the 
WORLD PREMIERE of “Confirmatum est” by David Evan Thomas.

Go and Tell John (arr. Carolyn Jennings)
; Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom Op. 31, No. 12 “We Hymn Thee” (Sergei Rachmaninoff); This Little Light of Mine (arr. Moses Hogan)
; Glory, Glory, Glory to the Newborn King (arr. Moses Hogan)

 


Classical music: Madison Youth Choirs presents its 11th Annual Winter Concert Series this coming Sunday afternoon and night.

December 11, 2013
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By Jacob Stockinger

Madison Youth Choirs (MYC) will present a winter concert series featuring over 300 talented young singers in three performances during the afternoon and evening of Sunday, December 15, at Madison’s First Congregational Church.

madison youth choirs

The nine performing choirs will raise their voices in celebration of MYC’s 11th season theme, “Arts and Minds.” Singers have spent a semester studying the connection between visual art and music, using both mediums as a lens to discover the world.

Concert selections will include works by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Benjamin Britten (below top), Palestrina, Johannes Brahms, Vincent Persichetti and Pablo Casals (below bottom), as well as a few holiday favorites and folk songs.

Benjamin Britten

Casals

Cantabile, MYC’s choir for advanced high school women, will also sing a hauntingly beautiful version of U2’s “With or Without You,” which earned the choir a standing ovation during a preview concert at Hilldale Mall this month.

All concerts will take place at First Congregational Church, 1609 University Ave., Madison

Tickets are available at the door. General admission is 
$12 general admission at the door, and free for children under 7.

HERE IS A MASTER SCHEDULE

1:30 P.M. – CANTILENA, CANTABILE, AND RAGAZZI (below, in a  photo by Dan Sinclair) (HIGH SCHOOL ENSEMBLES)

Selections from the 1:30 p.m. concert include:

“Turn Then Thine Eyes” (from “The Fairy-Queen”) by Henry Purcell

“Nigra Sum” by Pablo Casals

“Sicut Rosa” by Orlando di Lasso

“The Roadside Fire” (from “Songs of Travel”) by Ralph Vaughan Williams

“The Young Man’s Song” (premiere) by Eric William Barnum

“Ich weiss nicht” by Johannes Brahms

“Les Berceaux” (The Cradles) by Gabriel Faure

“Sam Was a Man” by Vincent Persichetti

Madison Youth Choirs Ragazzi by Dan Sinclair

4:30 P.M. – PURCELL, BRITTEN, HOLST, AND RAGAZZI (BOYCHOIRS)

Selections from 4:30 p.m. concert include:

“Bright is the Ring of Words” (from “Songs of Travel”) by Ralph Vaughan Williams

“Ich will den Herrn” by Georg Philipp Telemann

“Magno Gaudens: by Anonymous (12th century)

“All Things Bright and Beautiful” by John Rutter

“Sicut Rosa” by Orlando di Lasso

“The Roadside Fire” (from “Songs of Travel”) by Ralph Vaughan Williams

“The Young Man’s Song” (premiere) by Eric William Barnum

“Fancie” by Benjamin Britten

“Exultate Justi in Domino” by Lodovico Viadana

“All Ye Who Music Love” by Baldassare Donato (text from the 18th century, Thomas Oliphant)

7 P.M. – CHORALIERS (below, in a photo by Cynthia Hawkinson), CON GIOIA, AND CAPRICCIO (GIRLCHOIRS)

Selections from the 7 p.m. concert include:

Non Nobis Domine” by William Byrd

“Yet Gentle Will the Griffin Be” by Franciso Nuñez

“Fire” by Mary Goetze

“Dona Nobis Pacem,” attributed to Clemens non Papa

“Ich jauze, ich lache” (from BWV 15) by Johann Sebastian Bach

“Pavane” by Gabriel Fauré (at bottom in a popular YouTube video that features painting by Claude Monet and that has almost two million hits)

Madison Youth Choirs Choraliers by Cynthia Hawkinson

This project is supported by American Girl’s Fund for Children, by Dane Arts with additional funds from the Evjue Foundation, the charitable arm of The Capital Times, and by BMO Harris Bank.

ABOUT THE MADISON YOUTH CHOIRS (MYC)

Here is some additional impressive information from the Madison Youth Choirs:

Recognized as an innovator in youth choral education, Madison Youth Choirs inspires enjoyment, learning and social development through the study and performance of high-quality and diverse choral literature.

The oldest youth choir organization in Wisconsin, MYC welcomes singers of all ability levels, challenging them to learn more than just notes and rhythms. Singers explore the history, context, and heart of the music, becoming “expert noticers,” using music as a lens to discover the world. MYC serves more than 500 young people, ages 7-18, in 11 single-gender choirs.

In addition to a public concert series, MYC conducts an annual spring tour of schools and retirement centers, performing for more than 7,000 students and senior citizens annually. MYC also collaborates with professional arts organizations including the Madison Symphony Orchestra, the Madison Ballet and the Madison Opera, while continually supporting and recognizing the work of public schools and music educators throughout the area.

In summer 2014, MYC boychoirs will travel to Scotland for their first appearance at the prestigious “by invitation-only” Aberdeen International Youth Festival.

For more information – and to hear samples under the MEDIA section or find out about joining the group — visit: http://www.madisonyouthchoirs.org


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