The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: On this Memorial Day, The Ear honors not only soldiers but also civilians, COVID-19 victims and all those responders and workers who serve the public

May 25, 2020
4 Comments

PLEASE HELP THE EAR. IF YOU LIKE A CERTAIN BLOG POST, SPREAD THE WORD. FORWARD A LINK TO IT OR, SHARE IT or TAG IT (not just “Like” it) ON FACEBOOK. Performers can use the extra exposure to draw potential audience members to an event. And you might even attract new readers and subscribers to the blog.

By Jacob Stockinger

Today is Memorial Day 2020.

It is of course a largely military holiday. Most of the planned public events will be to honor those who died in service to their country. That usually means fallen soldiers and deceased veterans.

It also means that military cemeteries – like Arlington National Cemetery, below — will be decorated with American flags.

But The Ear doesn’t think we should forget that there are many ways to serve your country and protect the public, many kinds war and self-sacrifice.

Let’s not forget civilians, especially since worldwide more than twice the numbers of civilians died in World War II than did members of the armed forces. Lives are taken as well as given.

A larger definition of “national service” also seems especially timely since this weekend the U.S. is likely to surpass 100,000 deaths from COVID-19 during the coronavirus pandemic. They include many first responders and frontline workers (below) as well as grocery store workers and delivery drivers. Even “small” occupations have big heroes. There is no reason not to be more inclusive.

There are traditional kinds of music to honor the dead. They include requiems and elegies, military marches and funeral marches. And in the comment section you should feel free to suggest whatever music you think would be appropriate.

But The Ear found a piece he thinks is both unusual and ideal.

It is called “Old and Lost Rivers” by the contemporary American composer Tobias Picker (below). It is a beautiful, moving and contemplative piece, based on an actual place in Texas, that you can hear in the YouTube video at the bottom.

But you should know this about the work’s title.

With rivers, “lost” doesn’t mean forgotten or misplaced.

One dictionary defines it as “a surface stream that flows into an underground passageway” – and eventually often becomes part of a larger body of water such as a lake or the ocean.

It can also mean rivers that appear during heavy rain and then disappear when they evaporate during a drought.

Somehow, those images serve as fitting metaphors for our losses and that music seems a very appropriate way to honor those who sacrifice themselves and disappear in service to others.

The Ear hopes you agree.


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Classical music: Tickets to superstar soprano Renée Fleming’s recital at the Wisconsin Union Theater on Saturday, May 2, go on sale at 10 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 3 — unless you buy a $150 reception ticket before then

January 25, 2020
19 Comments

PLEASE HELP THE EAR. IF YOU LIKE A CERTAIN BLOG POST, SPREAD THE WORD. FORWARD A LINK TO IT OR, SHARE IT or TAG IT (not just “Like” it) ON FACEBOOK. Performers can use the extra exposure to draw potential audience members to an event. And you might even attract new readers and subscribers to the blog.

By Jacob Stockinger

Tickets for reserved seats at the 6 p.m. concert on Saturday, May 2, by superstar soprano Renée Fleming (below) in Shannon Hall at the Wisconsin Union Theater are $120 per person, with information about student tickets coming later.

Fleming will perform a variety of musical styles and genres, and will be accompanied by pianist Inon Barnatan (below).

General admission tickets for the 8 p.m. reception with food, music and an appearance by Fleming in the Great Hall – all in honor of the centennial anniversary of the WUT’s Concert Series — are separate and cost $150 per person.

Tickets to both events are available at Campus Arts Ticketing website where you can also find biographical details about Fleming.

But there is a catch.

If you buy a ticket to the reception now, you can also buy a ticket to the concert.

But if you want only a ticket to the concert, you must wait until they go on sale to the general public at 10 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 3.

You can call 608 265-ARTS (2787).

You can also go online to make reservations and buy tickets to both events:

https://artsticketing.wisc.edu/Online/default.asp?doWork::WScontent::loadArticle=Load&BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::article_id=4C96A4FA-FF76-4DC3-9214-DCA20FFF73A9

What do you think of the ticket prices for the concert and the reception?

And what do you think of the marketing strategy?

The Ear wants to hear.


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