The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: What is good music to listen to on Labor Day and to honor work? Here is a list to choose from. Can you add more?

September 7, 2015
5 Comments

REMINDER: The 37th annual Labor Day Concert by the Karp Family will take place tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Mills Hall on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Admission is FREE. The program includes works by Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven and Benjamin Britten as well as William Shakespeare.

Here is a link to a recent post with more details:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2015/09/04/classical-music-the-37th-annual-karp-family-labor-day-concert-is-this-monday-night-and-includes-works-by-bach-beethoven-and-britten-as-well-as-shakespeare/

By Jacob Stockinger

Today is Labor Day, 2015. (Below is a famous work photo by American photographer Lewis Hine.)

working Lewis hine photo

How can you celebrate it in music?

Here is a list of classical music that pertains to labor.

http://www.musiclassical.net/labor.html

And here is a poll from famed radio station WQXR FM in New York City:

http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/poll-what-music-best-captures-spirit-labor-day/

Below is “The Fruits of Labor” by famed Mexican artist Diego Rivera.

Diego Rivera The Fruits of Labor

Finally, here are links to three previous posts about Labor Day that The Ear did.

The first one is from 2014, when the day seemed a good occasion to remember all the other unnamed people besides performers — from the box office and administration to the stage — who make the musical performances we enjoy possible:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/classical-music-labor-day-is-a-great-time-to-remember-all-the-anonymous-people-behind-the-scenes-who-make-concerts-happen-and-who-bring-us-the-music-we-love/

The second post is from in 2013 and talks about the hard work of creating art and performing it  — such as required from a huge symphony orchestra (below) or a small ensemble or an individual. It also features other lists and something fitting from the “Farewell Symphony” by Franz Joseph Haydn:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2013/09/02/classical-music-on-labor-day-let-us-remember-and-celebrate-the-hard-work-and-solidarity-or-cooperation-of-making-and-delivering-art-by-listening-to-the-finale-of-haydns-farewell/

general_orchestra_helgeson

The final posting is from 2010 and features lots of reader suggestions as well as Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man”:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2010/09/06/classical-music-poll-what-is-good-music-for-celebrating-labor-dayc/

What music would you suggest listening to on Labor Day? Tell us in the COMMENT section.

The Ear wants to hear.

Giuseppe Verdi’s hammer-pounding “The Anvil Chorus” from the opera “Il Trovatore” usually ranks high on all the lists and suggestions.

So for this year’s Labor Day, here it is in a YouTube video at the bottom, in a lively and visually engaging and muscular performance from “Live From the Met in HD”:

 

 


Classical music: The 37th annual Karp Family Labor Day Concert is this Monday night and includes works by Bach, Beethoven and Britten as well as Shakespeare.

September 4, 2015
3 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

If there is a better embodiment of the saying “The show must go on,” I don’t know who it would be.

I am speaking of the Karp Family (seen below in an old photo), long considered Madison’s First Family of Music. (Members, from left, are Christopher Karp, Katrin Talbot, Howard Karp, Parry Karp and Frances Karp.)

karps 2008 - 13

For 37 years – and without repeating a piece — the Karps have given a Labor Day concert at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music, where the event traditionally marks the opening of the new concert season.

This year, the FREE concert is at 7:30 p.m. in Mills Hall.

It is quite the achievement that a Labor Day concert will even take place this year.

Last summer, patriarch pianist Howard Karp – a longtime professor at the UW-Madison – died at 84 while on vacation in Colorado.

Then this summer, the matriarch pianist Frances Karp had an accidental fall that put her out of commission. (She has recovered well, but had to to give up performing temporarily.)

Yet the rest of the family came together and changed the program to carry on the tradition. (The original program for this year is now scheduled to be performed next year with Frances Karp back at the piano.)

The performers this year are Isabel Karp (seen below top left with her sister Natasha Karp), narrator; Katrin Talbot, the wife of Parry Karp, viola; son Parry Karp, cello; and son Christopher Karp, piano.

Karp Memorial Isabel, Natasha smiling better

The program includes: “Elegy and Vision for Solo Cello” (1993) by Laurence Sherr; Two Chassidic Dances for Viola and Cello (1941-2) by Zigmund Schul; “Thoughts Tending to Ambition” (2015) by Katrin Talbot and Isabel Karp — a setting of the final soliloquy of William Shakespeare’sRichard II” for narrator, viola and cello; and the Second Suite for Solo Cello, Op. 80 (1967) by Benjamin Britten.

After intermission comes the Suite No. 2 in D Minor for Solo Cello (ca. 1720) by Johann Sebastian Bach. And the well-known Sonata in A Major for Piano and Cello, Op. 69 (1808) by  Ludwig van Beethoven. (You can hear the Beethoven sonata performed by cellist Yo-Yo Ma and pianist Emanuel Ax in the YouTube video at the bottom.)


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