The Well-Tempered Ear

Music education: This coming Friday night, the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras (WYSO) opens its 50th anniversary celebration with a FREE reception for a retrospective art display at Dane County Regional Airport. On this Monday night, mezzo-soprano Allisanne Apple sings a FREE recital.

September 20, 2015
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ALERT: This Monday night, Sept. 21, mezzo-soprano Allisanne Apple (below) and pianist Jane Peckham will present a FREE concert with the theme of  “Home/Travels/Longing/Return” that features songs by Leonard Bernstein, William Bolcom, Aaron Copland, Hugo Wolf and others. The recital is at 7 p.m. in the Oakwood Village West Auditorium, 6209 Mineral Point Road, on Madison’s far west side.

Alisanne Apple BW mug

By Jacob Stockinger

The Ear has been asked to distribute the following public invitation from Bridget Fraser, the executive director of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras (WYSO).

He is happy to do it in the belief that there is no better local investment in music education or in the future of classical music than WYSO, which has educated and trained thousands of area students and their parents over the past half-century.

WYSO Logo blue

Fraser writes:

“This coming Friday, Sept. 25, from 5 to 7 p.m. opens the year-long celebration of our 50th anniversary.

“I hope our friends, former conductors and staff, alumni and faithful supporters will join us as we pay tribute to the amazing impact that WYSO has had and continues to have on hundreds of young musicians each season.

“Local artist and devoted WYSO board member, Andree Valley has captured the true essence and importance of WYSO in a stunning visual display.

“You are invited to attend the opening celebration of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras retrospective exhibit, featuring 50 years of compelling history, captivating photographs and intriguing Art of Note painted violins (below) in an extensive display at the Dane County Regional Airport.

WYSO AoN violins 2015

Here is WYSO founder Marvin Rabin conducting the Youth Orchestra during the 1966-67 season:

WYSO Youth Orchestra Marvin Rabin conducting 1966-7

And here is UW-Madison professor and current WYSO music director James Smith conducting the Youth Orchestra in 2015:

WYSO Youth Orchestra James Smith conducting 2015

And at bottom is a YouTube video of the WYSO Youth Orchestra playing the rousing opening of Georges Bizet‘s Overture to his opera “Carmen.”

“The opening reception will feature music by WYSO’s premier quartet and light refreshments and hors d’oeuvres. Please join us in this tribute to the first 50 years of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras.

This exhibit was organized by Tandem Press, in collaboration with WYSO.
 For more information, click on our reception invitation, or  contact WYSO at (608) 263-3320 or wyso@wyso.music.wisc.edu.


Classical music: FREE choral concert by the “People’s Chorus” on Monday night to benefit the homeless.

August 16, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Ear’s friends at Edgewood College write:

Edgewood College Professor Sergei Pavlov (below) is bringing his talent to a unique stage.

He is one of two conductors for the “People’s Chorus,” a performance to bring awareness to the problem of homelessness in Greater Madison.

Sergei Pavlov

This special concert is at 7:30 p.m. on this coming Monday, Aug. 17, at the Orpheum Theater, 216 State Street, in Madison.

Orpheum Theatre Madison EXT

Orpheum Theatre INT

The concert is FREE to attend, but there will be a freewill offering in support of Porchlight.

Here is a link to the performers — some from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music — the sponsors and the program that will include music by Aaron Copland, Samuel Barber and Leonard Bernstein.

http://festivalchoirmadison.org/seasons/2015/PeoplesChorus_Program_Revised_8_10_15.pdf

Some of the performers in the People’s Chorus are homeless themselves.

“Music can be one of the ways to address challenges in society, and to hopefully make compassionate choices to meet those challenges,” Pavlov says. “Of course it is our way.”

The concert benefits Porchlight (below), a social services organization in Madison that seeks to decrease the homeless population by providing shelter, housing, supportive services and a sense of community in ways that empower residents and program participants to positively shape their lives.

porchlight 1

 

 


Classical music: Today marks 70 years since the United States dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. The Ear commemorates the event with Samuel Barber’s “Adagio for Strings.” What music would you choose?

August 6, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

Today is August 6, 2015 – the 70th anniversary of the United States dropping the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan in the hope of ending World War II. (That took a second atomic bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki.)

Controversy still rages about whether it was the right decision to make.

The Ear has an opinion about that, but is keeping it to himself.

All he wants to do today is commemorate the historic event with music.

hiroshima1ruinslarge

First, as background, here is a story from The Washington Post about what it was like to survive the bombing of Hiroshima:

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/what-it-was-like-to-survive-the-atomic-bombing-of-hiroshima/ar-BBlpDXY,

I can’t think of a better piece of music to listen to this day than the sadly eloquent, heart-wrenching and poignant Adagio for Strings by Samuel Barber (below), which is at the bottom in a YouTube video and is performed by Leonard Bernstein conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The moving music does not take sides, but simply expresses profound sorrow.

Samuel Barber 2 composing

Perhaps you have other choices for this day. Maybe a chorale from a passion or cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach? Maybe an aria by George Frideric Handel? Perhaps a Requiem by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Johannes Brahms, Giuseppe Verdi or Gabriel Faure? Maybe the  Ninth Symphony “Ode to Joy” by Ludwig van Beethoven or the Symphony No. 2 “Resurrection” by Gustav Mahler? Maybe the opera “Doctor Atomic” by John Adams?

Leave your thoughts and choice in the COMMENT section.

The Ear wants to hear.


Classical music: Are individuals and groups that perform classical music in the U.S., Wisconsin and Madison racist? If not, why don’t we hear more music from African-American, Hispanic and Asian composers?

August 18, 2013
20 Comments

By Jacob Stockinger

Is classical music in Madison — and in Wisconsin and the U.S. — racist?

Most of the classical musicians I know, and most of the performing and visual artists for that matter, take pride in being politically progressive and liberal in their political leanings and social sympathies.

Wisconsin Capitol

And yet.

And yet, I have to ask the difficult question: If that is true, why are we not hearing more music from “minority” composers who are African American, Hispanic and Latino, American Indian and Asian — but especially African American composers since the other kinds of music they have written, from spirituals and blues to jazz, seem to have inspired so much mainstream classical music, both American and European.

Could it be — at least when it comes to classical music — that this famously liberal city is not really as progressive as we hope or claim, that we are not as culturally tolerant and ethnically diverse as we think we are? Is that why I can’t recall a single live performance of a long or short work by William Grant Still (below)?

William Grant Still

Curiously, it was a famous and popular Czech composer, Antonin Dvorak (below), who is recognized for acknowledging black and American Indian music in his Symphony No. 9 “From the New World.”

dvorak

It is a difficult and embarrassing question to ask and issue to bring up. And I include myself, since my own collection of classical CDs, as I recently discovered, contains almost no music by African Americans.

In “Artists in Exile,” the extremely insightful cultural historian Joseph Horowitz (below) has written about and documented the bias and shows how the American classical music scene has always been Eurocentric and biased toward the Germanic school – Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann and Brahms for a start.

joseph horowitz

I would add that American musicians also seem biased toward Anglo-American composers. Even Italian composers are generally mainstream repertoire except when it comes to some baroque music and especially to opera, but not much else. And Spanish music seems to come into favor only whenever there is an outstanding Spanish performers – as happened with Isaac Albeniz and Enrique Granados in the hands of the late pianist Alicia de Larrocha.

Anyway, the issue of classical music and racism came to mind recently when I read a wonderful post on NPR’s outstanding blog “Deceptive Cadence.” Jeffrey Mumford (below), an African American composer, spoke about the situation in an NPR interview. He rightly questioned why more Americans don’t know and hear works, especially symphonies, by African American and black composers performed.

Jeffrey Mumford

Mumford specifically cited works by George Walker (below top), who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1996 and whose early “Lyric Suite” for string orchestra can be heard at the bottom in a YouTube video; and the “The Black Mozart,” Joseph Boulogne, also known as the Chevalier De Saint-Georges (below bottom), whose violin virtuosity and compositions were admired by Franz Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven:

african_american_symphony

Joseph de Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint Georges

So I find myself asking: Does that same criticism apply to liberal Madison and its performing arts scene?

After all, I have a hard time recalling when groups that I love and attend frequently -– such as the Madison Symphony Orchestra, the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, various UW-Madison groups, large and small, and other ensembles — have indeed performed African American musicians and put them before the general public with a high profile. 

Could that be why more African Americans don’t subscribe to or attend their concerts?

Here is a link to the thought-provoking essay from the NPR blog, which also has terrific sound snippets:

http://www.npr.org/blogs/deceptivecadence/2013/08/10/210527949/the-american-symphonic-legacy-not-just-for-white-guys

Maybe I am mistaken in my musings and in my embarrassment at Madison sharing a form of artistic racism.

I look forward to reading the reactions, opinions and facts that I hope to get from other readers.

The Ear wants to hear.


Classical music: American pianist Van Cliburn has been diagnosed with advanced cancer. The Ear dedicates Cliburn’s playing of the beautiful and touching Liszt-Schubert song “Dedication” to honor the pleasure, joy and inspiration he has given to so many.

August 29, 2012
14 Comments

 

By Jacob Stockinger

Judging from news reports, an icon of American classical music is living out his final days.

American pianist Van Cliburn (below, in a photo taken by Ross Hailey for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram), now 78, has been diagnosed with advanced bone cancer . The very consistent stories, clearly taken form the same press release, do not say whether it is Stage III or Stage IV (there is no Stage V) but the word “advanced” suggests it is one of them and is probably beyond any hope of a cure or even a long survival.

As a young pianist, Cliburn was a superstar sensation with the public, the first classical musician to sell one million LPs (of his live recording of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1) and the first classical musician to get $10,000 a night. Sviatoslav Richter, one of the giants of 20th century Russian pianism also thought Cliburn so gifted that he handed Cliburn all his votes to seal Cliburn’s win in the first International Tchaikovsky Competition (below).

But Cliburn has also had his detractors, critics who found his performances uneven and lazy, especially as he aged and seemed to grow bored with his art. And some people including The Ear, also wish that he had come out publicly, despite his conservative politics and apparently deep religious beliefs.

For myself, in his prime I found most of his performances very good and several of his performances stupendous, including his Tchaikovsky First and Rachmaninoff Third concertos, but also his MacDowell Second Concerto.

Anyway, in an earlier post I asked: How good was Van Cliburn?

Here is a link:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2011/04/17/classical-music-how-good-was-pianist-van-cliburn/

And here are links to the latest story from The Associated Press about Cliburn and his diagnosis of cancer:

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2012/08/28/arts/ap-us-cliburn-illness.html?_r=1&ref=arts

http://www.spinner.com/2012/08/28/van-cliburn-cancer/

http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/news/story/2012-08-27/van-cliburn-cancer-diagnosis/57355752/1

I don’t know if Cliburn reads The Well-Tempered Ear, but if he doesn’t now maybe he will if there are enough hits or somebody forwards it to him.

So leave a message in the COMMENTS column.

And tell us about your favorite Van Cliburn moments or performance.

One of mine is his playing of Franz Liszt’s transcription of Robert Schumann‘s song  “Widmung” (Dedication) — which was a favorite encore of Cliburn in his heyday and which is meant to honor the joy, the beauty and the inspiration he provided to so many young listeners and players, including me.. (Many more such moments, including Chopin, Brahms  and Debussy can be found for free on YouTube. Tear yourself and listen to a few).

 


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