The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music education: This Thursday morning, WORT-FM 89.9 will air a lengthy tribute to retiring UW-Madison and Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras conductor Jim Smith

May 16, 2017
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By Jacob Stockinger

Rich Samuels hosts the radio show “Anything Goes” every Thursday morning on WORT-FM 89.9.

But Samuels is also a documenter extraordinaire of the local classical music scene. Chances are you have seen him operating his computer and microphones at a recent concert.

Most recently, he brought the revival of Bach Around the Clock to his listeners.

Now he has done it again.

Here is what he wrote to The Ear, who is grateful for his many efforts:

“I just finished editing a 52-minute tribute to Maestro James Smith (below, rehearsing at the UW-Madison) who conducts his final Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra concert this coming Sunday at the Overture Center in a joint appearance, called “Side by Side,” with the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra.

“This segment will air this week at 7:08 a.m. on my Thursday WORT broadcast.

“Listeners will hear Maestro Smith (below, conducting WYSO students) prepare his young musicians for the Sunday event and hear him reflect on his 32 years on the WYSO podium.

“Also contributing to the segment are WYSO alumni violist Vicki Powell (now based in Berlin), violinist David Cao (a joint music and pre-med major at Northwestern University) and Beth Larson (of the Madison Symphony Orchestra, Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and Willy Street Chamber Players, to name a few of her many affiliations).”

Smith’s final WYSO concert is in Overture Hall of the Overture Center on Sunday afternoon at 4:30 p.m. The concert is FREE and open to the public. No tickets are required and seating is general admission. Doors open at 3:45 p.m. (You can hear a short sample of a 2015 Side by Side in the YouTube video at the bottom.)

The program includes music by Nikolai Rimsky Korsakov, Georges Bizet, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Niccolo Paganini, Ottorino Respighi and Dmitri Shostakovich.

For more information about the Side-by-Side concert by the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and WYSO, go to:

https://wisconsinchamberorchestra.org/performances/side-by-side-1/


Classical music: Chamber music for horn, jazz music for saxophone, a master class for pianists plus concertos for various instruments and a new composition are featured this week at the UW-Madison

February 7, 2017
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CORRECTION: In an early version of yesterday’s post, The Ear mistakenly said that performances by the Madison Opera of “Charlie Parker’s Yardbird” are on Saturday night at 8 as well as Sunday afternoon at 2:30. The first performance is FRIDAY NIGHT at 8 p.m. – NOT Saturday night. The Ear apologizes for the error.

Here are two links with more information about the opera and the production:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2017/02/06/classical-music-jazz-and-classical-music-are-not-so-different-says-composer-daniel-schnyder-he-discusses-his-score-to-charlie-parkers-yardbird-which-the-madison-opera-st/

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2017/01/17/classical-music-madison-opera-will-present-the-midwest-premiere-of-charlie-parkers-yardbird-here-are-the-many-preparatory-events-for-the-public/

By Jacob Stockinger

This is a busy week with a wide diversity of music at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music.

Here is a run-down by day:

WEDNESDAY

At 7:30 p.m. in Mills Hall, UW hornist Daniel Grabois (below, in a photo by James Gill) will be joined by fellow UW-Madison professor pianist Christopher Taylor for a concert of brass music that is FREE and OPEN to the public.

The program features works by Franz Strauss (Empfindungen am Meere), Paul Hindemith (Alto Horn Sonata), Maurice Ravel (Horn Sonata, originally Violin Sonata) and Jean-Michel Damase (Sonata).

Daniel Grabois 2012 James Gill

THURSDAY

At 7:30 p.m. (NOT 7, as mistakenly first stated in yesterday’s post)  in Morphy Recital Hall, saxophonist Daniel Schnyder will perform  music by American jazz titan Charlie Parker with the Blue Note Ensemble and also participate in a Q&A session. The event is FREE and open to the public.

Schnyder is the composer of the opera “Charlie Parker’s Yardbird” that the Madison Opera will perform in the Capitol Theater of the Overture Center on Friday night at 8 p.m. and Sunday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. See the above correction for links to more information about the opera.

daniel-schnyder-2017

FRIDAY

From 4:30 to 6 p.m. in Mills Hall, Venezuelan pianist Gabriela Montero will offer a FREE and PUBLIC master class. The Ear has no details about what will be featured.

Montero (below, in a photo by Shelley Mosman), who specializes in spontaneous improvisations but also performs standard repertoire, will perform at 8 p.m. on this Saturday night at the Wisconsin Union Theater. (In the YouTube video at the bottom, you can hear her live improvisations in Cologne, Germany on the aria theme of Johann Sebastian Bach‘s well-known “Goldberg” Variations.)

Here is a link with more information, including ticket prices, concert and recording reviews and audio-video clips, about her recital in Shannon Hall at the Wisconsin Union Theater:

https://union.wisc.edu/events-and-activities/event-calendar/event/gabriela-montero/

And here is a link to more information about Montero, who also has won awards for her playing, improvisations and her Piano Concerto No. 1:

http://www.gabrielamontero.com

gabriela-montero-2017-shelley-mosman

SUNDAY

At 7:30 p.m. in Mills Hall is the annual Symphony Showcase with the winners of the UW concerto competition and the world premiere of a student composition. The concert will be conducted by Professor James Smith and graduate student Kyle Knox.

Admission to the event costs $10 for adults; students and children get in for free. There is also a FREE post-concert reception at the nearby University Club.

For more information about the program (violin works by Ravel and Shostakovich, vocal works by Ravel and Gounod, a trumpet work by Oskar Boehme) and biographies of the five student performers (below) plus student composer (Nathan Froebe), go to:

http://www.music.wisc.edu/event/uw-symphony-orchestra-showcase/

uw-symphony-showcase-performers-2017


Classical music: Four major retirements this spring could put the UW-Madison School of Music in a staffing bind and could further hurt the standing of the university

December 19, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

Merry Christmas!

NOT.

Happy New Year!

NOT.

Just as the first semester is coming to an end, The Ear has learned that four major retirements in the spring will put the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music staffing and teaching in a bind that poses some major challenges.

Three of the retirements are by major performers. The fourth is by a major scholar, a musicologist and music historian.

Here they are in alphabetical order:

  • John Aley (below), professor of trumpet. Aley, who has a national and international reputation and who once played with the American Brass Quintet, is also the principal trumpet of the Madison Symphony Orchestra and plays in the Wisconsin Brass Quintet. He plans to continue to reside in Madison and to continue his MSO duties one season at a time.

For more information, go to: http://www.music.wisc.edu/faculty/john-aley/

john aley color

  • Lawrence Earp (below), professor of musicology. Since 1984, Earp, a trained bassoonist, has taught courses about and researched music and composers across the entire history of Western classical music.

For more information, go to: http://www.music.wisc.edu/faculty/lawrence-earp/

Faculty

Faculty

  • Stephanie Jutt (below), professor of flute. Jutt, who is principal flute of the Madison Symphony Orchestra, also is co-founder and co-artistic director of the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society.

Jutt plans to move to her native New York City to live, but says she will continue her duties with the MSO and the BDDS.

For more information, go to: http://www.music.wisc.edu/faculty/stephanie-jutt/

Stephanie Jutt CR Dick Ainsworth

  • James Smith (below), professor of conducting, who has led the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, the UW Chamber Orchestra and is the music director of the University Opera. Earlier this year, he announced his retirement as the longtime music director of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras.

Smith, a one-time professional clarinetist, plans to move into a new house he has built in Cross Plains where he will work on his repertoire and pursue stints as a freelance guest conductor.

For more information, go to: http://www.music.wisc.edu/faculty/james-smith/

UW Chamber Orchestra, James Smith, conductor

All four have served the UW-Madison and area music-lovers well indeed and for a long time.

The bind for the music school is that, thanks to the boa constrictor-like choke hold on the UW-Madison’s budget and staffing by Gov. Scott Walker and his anti-intellectual, anti-education cronies in the Legislature and on the Board of Regents, tenured faculty do not usually get replaced by tenure-track positions. Instead the school has had to offer most new teachers non-renewable three-year stints as adjunct professors.

True, there is a long of talented people out there looking for jobs. So adjuncts are not necessarily inferior performers or teachers. But who wants to be moving around every few years and starting over?

As far as The Ear understands it, in the long-term the move to adjuncts is not good for the students, especially graduate students, for other faculty members and for the reputation of the School of Music, which has managed to secure major funding support for construction and physical plant projects but much less support for staff and scholarships.

Clearly, it introduces an element of instability and insecurity that hardly seems helpful in the competitive academic market place.

In any case, The Ear congratulates all the retirees on their distinguished careers and thanks them for so many years of public service and so many enjoyable hours of performing  and understanding great music. They will be missed.

Feel free to leave your own comments and reactions in the COMMENT section.

No doubt the future retirees would like to hear from you.

And The Ear too wants to hear.


Classical music: The UW-Madison Symphony Strings performs a forceful all-Beethoven program. Plus, the So Percussion ensemble performs Saturday night and the Edgewood College Chamber Orchestra performs on Sunday afternoon.

November 6, 2015
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ALERTS: First, a reminder that the acclaimed and innovative So percussion ensemble performs this Saturday night at 8 p.m. in Shannon Hall at the Wisconsin Union Theater. Here is a link with information about the program, which includes the minimalism of Steve Reich, and the performers as well as tickets:

http://www.uniontheater.wisc.edu/Season15-16/so-percussion.html

The Edgewood College Chamber Orchestra will perform this Sunday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. in the St. Joseph Chapel, 1000 Edgewood College Drive. The orchestra, under the direction of Blake Walter, will perform the “Lucio Silla” Overture by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart; the Concertino for Horn and Orchestra in D major by Michael Haydn, featuring horn soloist Dafydd Bevil; “Three Pieces in the Old Style” by Henryk Gorecki; and the Symphony No. 2 in A Minor by Camille Saint-Saëns. Admission is $5, or free with Edgewood College ID.

By Jacob Stockinger

Don’t be fooled by the name.

The UW Symphony Strings Orchestra (below) is a lot more than string players who also belong to the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra. And it is NOT to be confused with the All-University String Orchestra, which is made up of amateur musicians and non-music students and is conducted by Janet Jensen.

UW Symphony Strings copy

Conductor Kyle Knox (below) explains:

During one concert cycle per year, the UW Symphony Orchestra performs at Music Hall with UW Opera.  Given the space limitations of the opera pit, not all of our 75 Symphony members will play the opera.

So during this period the Symphony is split into two ensembles – Opera Orchestra and Symphony Strings.  Professor James Smith conducts the Opera Orchestra and I conduct the Symphony Strings.

Symphony Strings is a good venue for our players to perform some of the core classical chamber orchestra repertory.  Given the reduced size of the ensemble and the stylistic demands of music from the late Classical period, the Symphony Strings provides a wholly different performance challenge as compared to what they will experience in the large orchestra works performed in other concert cycles.

Playing Mozart and playing Mahler are very different experiences.  Both are difficult, but in different ways.  Last year, we did Mozart’s Symphony No. 36 and Haydn’s Symphony No. 88. This year, we’ll do two of the lesser-performed Beethoven Symphonies, Nos. 1 and 4.

As its name suggests, Symphony Strings has traditionally been a “strings only’ group.”  When necessary, recruitment for winds, brass and percussion starts with players from the Symphony Orchestra roster who are not involved with the opera. Inevitably players from other ensembles are recruited as needed to ensure that all parts are covered.  It all works out one way or another.

Kyle Knox 2

True to Knox’s words, it does work out.

A week ago Wednesday night in Mills Hall the Symphony Strings did indeed perform two symphonies by Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 1 and Symphony No. 4. (You can hear Symphony No. 1 performed by the Vienna Philharmonic under conductor Christian Thielemann in a YouTube video at the bottom.)

And sure enough, as well as strings, the orchestra included the required winds, brass and percussion.

The playing by all parties was very good. True, you could detect some unevenness. The cellos (below), for example, seemed especially polished and better in pitch or intonation than the violins, which were rough by comparison. Maybe that is because the cello section includes more accomplished undergraduates or more advanced graduate students or because the section is smaller in number or because the cello part is easier.

UW Symphony Strings cellos

Still, one has to make allowances. After all, these are students, not professionals. And it is still early in the season and school year. Most of all, Beethoven simply is not easy, not even early Beethoven.

And that was one of the highlights. The program included two lesser-known Beethoven symphonies and they went together extremely well.

Graduate student conductor Knox (below, center right), who is quite busy these days with many engagements — including the Middleton Community Orchestra and the Madison Opera — drew sharp attacks and clean quick releases, forceful accents, sudden and dramatic dynamic shifts in tempi and volume. Those are all hallmarks of exceptional Beethoven playing.

Kyle Knox conducting UW Symphony Strings

It was enough to make The Ear hope that the group does another program with Beethoven’s two other less well-known symphonies: Nos. 2 and 8. Maybe next semester, or maybe next year.

Then again, The Ear loves the same early Beethoven (below), influenced by the Classical era of Haydn and Mozart, that many other listeners skip over: the early symphonies, the early piano sonatas, the early piano trio, the early violin sonatas, the early cello sonata and the early string quartets.

young beethoven etching in 1804

And often a soloist pulls up the quality, so perhaps a faculty soloist would be a good addition.

But soloist or not, it is well worth hearing.

So The Ear highly encourages orchestral fans to go. The next performance is on Thursday, March 17, at 7:30 p.m. in Mills Hall. No program is listed yet. But write the concert into your datebooks. You’ll be happy you did.


Classical music: Opera director David Ronis of CUNY is named to succeed William Farlow. University Opera’s production of Hector Berlioz’ charming “Beatrice et Benedict” is a fine and fitting tribute to the longtime tenure of retiring director William Farlow. The last performance is tonight at 7:30 p.m.

April 15, 2014
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EDITOR’S NOTE: Please note that some reviews of productions last weekend are being delayed to make room for previews of the many upcoming concerts and musical events this week.

NEWS:  David Ronis (below) of Queen’s College and the Aaron Copland School of Music at the City University of New York (CUNY) has just been named as the interim one-year visiting director of University Opera, to succeed William Farlow. Here is a link to the official press release with his impressive resume on the blog Fanfare:

http://uwmadisonschoolofmusic.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/ronis_press_release/

David Ronis BIG BW USE

By Jacob Stockinger

Here is a special posting, a review written by frequent guest critic and writer for this blog, John W. Barker. Barker (below) is an emeritus professor of Medieval history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also is a well-known classical music critic who writes for Isthmus and the American Record Guide, and who hosts an early music show every other Sunday morning on WORT FM 89.9 FM. He serves on the Board of Advisors for the Madison Early Music Festival and frequently gives pre-concert lectures in Madison.

John-Barker

By John W. Barker

The University Opera at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has a long history of including rarities in its productions, rarities that audiences are not likely to see elsewhere.

For his farewell offering as he retires at the end of this academic year, director William Farlow (below, in a photo by Katherine Esposito) has put on a particularly enterprising novelty. That “Beatrice et Benedict: — is the last and most successful of the three operas by the early French Romantic composer Hector Berlioz.

William Farlow by Kathy Esposito

Berlioz (below) wrote the libretto as well as the music, freely adapting his stripped-down version from the play “Much Ado About Nothing by” Shakespeare — an author whose works he adored. Berlioz cast it in the form of the opéra comique, combining set-piece musical numbers with spoken dialogue. It was the same form used not only by Jacques Offenbach, but also by Georges Bizet for his “Carmen.” Nevertheless, Berlioz infused the form with his own individual wit, imagination, and personality. The score is full of absolutely beautiful music, with a dip into satire as well. (You can hear the opera’s Overture performed by Sir Neville Marriner and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields at Carnegie Hall in You Tube video at the bottom.)

berlioz

The UW Opera presented this opera before, in 1988, in the days of Karlos Moser, in a semi-staged concert performance. This time, Farlow has given it a complete staging, employing mostly exemplars of the gifted vocal talent the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music has been drawing lately.

(The last of three performances is tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Music Hall at the foot of Bascom Hill.)

In the performance I attended Sunday night, the feuding lovers, the two title characters, Shakespeare’s Beatrice and Benedick, were sung by the agile soprano Lindsay Metzger and high tenor Daniel López-Matthews. (Below right and left, respectively, in a photo by Max Wendt). The other pair of lovers, Hero and Claudio, were portrayed by the powerfully voiced soprano Anna Whiteway and tenor Jordan Wilson. The local commander, Don Pedro, was taken by bass Erik Larson.

berlioz UW Opera Beatrice et Benedict 2 CR Max Wendt

To these the cast added two veterans. Edgewood College teacher and mezzo-soprano Kathleen Otterson (below) is a long-standing veteran of UW Opera and Madison music-making, always welcome any time, in anything, including the role here of Ursula, Hero’s friend. And baritone Benjamin Schultz, a returned alumnus, sang the comic role that Berlioz invented, Somarone, as a caricature of the pompous rivals and academics who were the composer’s life-long opposition.

Kathleen Otterson 2

Following a frequent practice when this opera is presented outside of France, the vocal numbers were sung in the original French, while the revised dialogue was given in English. It’s a workable solution to a problem for singers who can sing in French, but really can’t speak it well. Fine as the singing was, it was clear that they were not uniformly comfortable singing French.

Still, many moments were truly gorgeous, notably the Hero-Ursula duet in Act I, and the ladies’ trio in Act II, as well as the offstage wedding chorus.

By and large, Farlow’s stage direction was careful: in the vocal set pieces often relatively static, though, that was certainly preferable to too much action. In the case of Somarone’s Act I scene, Schulz was made to go much too far beyond satire, into exaggerated silliness. And Beatrice’s over-acting in Act I really compromised the character’s self-assured sassiness before her “fall.”

Still, even with so much of the dueling wordplay of Shakespeare’s original removed, Metzger and López-Matthews engaged well as the couple who had to be tricked into discovering that their outward hostility covered a profound attraction.

A particular asset was the pit orchestra that conductor James Smith (below) was able to work up very successfully to Berlioz’s tricky requirements.

Smith_Jim_conduct07_3130

William Farlow departs leaving us with many debts to him, including this demonstration that Berlioz’s gem of a comic opera really deserves more regular presentation.

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Classical music: Let us now praise University of Wisconsin conductor James Smith and the marvels he achieves with student orchestras. Plus, the UW Chamber Orchestra performs a FREE concert tonight of music by Schumann, Haydn and Wagner.

October 1, 2013
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REMINDER: At 7:30 p.m. tonight in Mills Hall, the UW Chamber Orchestra (below) under conductor James Smith performs a FREE concert. The program features the “Overture, Scherzo, and Finale” by Robert Schumann; the Symphony No. 88 by Franz Joseph Haydn and the “Siegfried Idyll” by Richard Wagner.  

UW Chamber Orchestra low res

By Jacob Stockinger

Here is a special posting, a review written by frequent guest critic and writer for this blog, John W. Barker. Barker (below) is an emeritus professor of Medieval history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also is a well-known classical music critic who writes for Isthmus and the American Record Guide, and who hosts an early music show every other Sunday morning on WORT-FM 89.9. He serves on the Board of Advisors for the Madison Early Music Festival and frequently gives pre-concert lectures in Madison.

John-Barker

By John W. Barker

Last weekend witnessed the acclaim justly given to John DeMain for what he has built the Madison Symphony Orchestra into during his 20 years with it.  But on Sunday evening, there was a demonstration of the debt we owe to another conductor and his orchestra.

James Smith (below) has built his orchestral programs for the UW School of Music into something quire remarkable in their own terms.  Evidence of this was on display at Sunday night’s concert in Mills Hall on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.  A considerable, if hardly capacity audience, but an enthusiastic one, heard the 2013 season opening event for the UW Symphony Orchestra, in a really meaty program, to say the least.

Smith_Jim_conduct07_3130

To begin, Smith yielded the podium to Kyle Knox (below), a graduate student and conducting assistant, for Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Egmont” Overture.  His was a young man’s projection of the familiar piece, not without nuances, but basically a propulsive and dramatic reading.  The orchestra sounded confident and secure under his baton.

Kyle Knox 2

Smith then took over for a work of special appeal for me: the Third Symphony of Jean Sibelius.

For most of the public, it is the First, Second, and Fifth of Sibelius’s seven Symphonies that are likely to be familiar.  Beyond those, some may know the austere Fourth, the enigmatic Sixth and the hyper-concise Seventh.  But the Third has been overlooked consistently, which is a great pity.

The symphonies by Sibelius (below) are each highly individual and different from each other–with the exception of the Third and the Fifth.  They are really two peas from the same pod, and, to be blunt, the Third is the fresher (and less hackneyed) of the two.

Its three-movement structure is for the most part a blueprint Sibelius then used for the Fifth.  But, following the blowsy Second, I find that the Third has the spontaneity of a new and revitalized start in the composer’s self-definition.  Quite frankly, it is my personal favorite among the Seven.

Smith seemed to find exactly that freshness in the work.  His body language showed that he put himself wholly into projecting this inventive and colorful score.  If only other conductors had his courage and gave this work more exposure!

sibelius

The “biggie” of the concert was, of course, what followed the intermission.  We have been rediscovering this year just how provocative and shocking Igor Stravinsky’s Le Sacre du printemps, or “The Rite of Spring,, can still be. When new, the work Stravnsky (below) was regarded by many musicians as unplayable.  Now, any orchestra worth its salt can take it on — even a “student” orchestra.

Igor Stravinsky young with score 2

But the UW Orchestra (below in a photo by John W. Barker) is no mere ”student” ensemble. James Smith has worked it up to a level of professionalism matching the standards and capabilities of ever so many big-city orchestras today.  Oh, sure, a few very trifling and inconsequential fluffs at odd instants here and there, what any orchestra might risk. But this group has become an instrument on which Smith could play miracles.  The players were totally with him, while his clear heat and precise cues gave them safe guidance.

UW Symhony Orchestra 2013 CR John W. Barker

Smith seemed to aim at an emphasis on rhythmic power, though he found passages to remind us of the work’s underlying Russian-ness amid all the “primitivism.”  In his careful preparation of the many climaxes, he had his orchestra pour out torrents of sound that were extraordinarily compelling.

There were many individual players one might single out.  For me, though, I found most fascinating the first of the two timpanists, a young woman who threw herself into her work with athletic abandon.

To sum up, this was a simply thrilling performance, within a totally wonderful concert.

It is a crying shame that the tightly limited attention paid by our journalistic establishment to Madison’s musical riches is so particularly restrictive in its recognition of the music-making available on campus. In any other place and circumstance, to have an orchestra and conductor such as the UW School of Music has blessed us with would be celebrated with due pride and attention.

But Madison’s audiences really should pay heed to what is being done on the UW campus.

Above all, it should give proper recognition to the wonderful work of the versatile James Smith (below in a photo by Jack Burns) with his various orchestra ensembles, which include the UW Symphony Orchestra, the UW Chamber Orchestra (which performs a FREE concert of Schumann, Haydn and Wagner tonight at 7:30 in Mills Hall) and the University Opera. (Smith is also the music director of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras.)

James Smith cond Jack Burns

I recall an incident when a local politician sneered: “Why should a university have a symphony orchestra?”  To which the logical rejoinder might be: “Why should a university have a football team?”


Classical music: Here is Part 2 of 2 with a schedule of concerts for the SPRING Semester at the University of Wisconsin- Madison School of Music.

August 15, 2012
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By Jacob Stockinger

The brochures are almost printed and in the mail.

But you can still get out your calendars and datebooks.

The Ear has been given the schedule of concerts by faculty and guest artists at the University of Wisconsin School of Music.

Yesterday, I offered events for First or Fall Semester – September through December.

Today, I list concerts for the Second or Spring Semester – January through May.

Programs for concerts are not yet available. But you can always check the Events Calendar at www.music.wisc.edu/events

Also, because of building renovations, the Wisconsin Union Theater concerts will take place in Mills Hall.

School of Music, University of Wisconsin-Madison Performances for  2012-2013 in a Calendar of Events

Admission is FREE except where noted with an $

JANUARY

Mon 28: Dylan Chmura Moore, trombone (GAS). Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

FEBRUARY

Mon 4: Eli Kalman, piano (GAS); Bruce Atwell, horn. Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 6: Daniel Grabois, horn (below, FCS). Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Sat 9: The Knights chamber orchestra with Wu Man, pipa (below, WUT) $; Mills, 8 p.m.

Thu 14: Black Music Ensemble, Richard Davis, director. Morphy, 8:30 p.m.

Fri 15: UW Symphony Orchestra, James Smith, conductor. Student concerto competition winners. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 16: Pro Arte Quartet (below in a photo by Rick Langer, FCS). Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 17: UW Chamber Orchestra, Kevin McMahon, conductor. Mills, 2 p.m.

Wed 20: Western Percussion Ensemble, Anthony Di Sanza, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 22: Sole Nero (FCS). Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 23: Wind Ensemble, Scott Teeple, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 24: Concert Band, Michael Leckrone, conductor. Mills, 2 p.m.

Mon 25: Pavel Morunov, oboe (GAS); Johanna Bourkova-Morunov, violin; Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

MARCH

Fri 1: Parry Karp, violoncello (below, FCS); Eli Kalman, piano. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 2: Wingra Woodwind Quintet (FCS). Morphy, 8 p.m.

Sun 3: The Thimmig-Johnson Duo (FCS); Les Thimmig, clarinets and saxophone; Jessica Johnson, piano. Mills, 2 p.m.

Sun 3: Woodwind-Piano Duo Competition Winners. Morphy, 3:30 p.m.

Sun 3: Contemporary Chamber Ensemble, composer Laura Schwendinger (below), director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 6: Gretzler (FCS); Daniel Grabois, horn; Mark Hetzler, trombone. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Thu 7: Périphére (GAS), Joseph Dangerfield, director. Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 8 and Sat 9: Disklavierfest (GAS); Jaroslaw Kapuscinski and Daniel Koppelman, disklavier. Programs, times and halls To Be Announced.

Sun 10: University Bands. Mills, 2 p.m.

Thu 14: Christopher Taylor, piano (below, FCS). Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 15, Sun 17 and Tue 19: University Opera with UW Symphony Orchestra $; William Farlow, director; James Smith, conductor; “L’amico Fritz,” by Mascagni. Music Hall, 7:30 p.m. (Fri and Tue), 3 p.m. (Sun)

Fri 15: Wisconsin Brass Quintet (FCS). Mills, 8 p.m.

Tue 19: Concert Band, Michael Leckrone, conductor. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 20: UW Chamber Orchestra, James Smith (below), conductor. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Thu 21: Symphony Strings, James Smith, conductor. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

APRIL

Fri 5: Emily Birsan, soprano (GAS); Jamie Van Eyck, mezzo-soprano; John Arnold, bass-baritone; Kirstin Ihde, piano. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 7: University of Iowa Center for New Music, David Gompper, director. Mills, 4 p.m.

Wed 10: Pro Arte Quartet (FCS), Nobuko Imai, viola. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Thu 11: Jeremy Denk, piano (below, WUT) $; Mills, 8 p.m.

Fri 12: Uri Vardi, violoncello (FCS). Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 13: Tuba and Euphonium Ensemble, Matthew Mireles, director. Mills, 4 p.m.

Sat 13: Concert Choir, Beverly Taylor, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 14: Marc Fink (below), oboe & Friends (FCS). Mills, 2 p.m.

Sun 14: Trio Antigo (GAS). Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Tue 16: Brass Ensemble, Daniel Grabois and Mark Hetzler, directors. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 17: Guitar Ensemble, Javier Calderón, director. Mills, 8:30 p.m.

Thu 18: Julie Fowlis, Scottish singer and multi-instrumentalist (WUT) $; Music Hall, 8 p.m.

Thu 18: Black Music Ensemble, Richard Davis, director. Morphy, 8:30 p.m.

Fri 19: Madrigal Singers, Bruce Gladstone, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 20: Perlman Piano Trio. Morphy, 3:30 p.m.

Sat 20: Madrigal Singers, Bruce Gladstone, conductor. Mills, 4 p.m.

Sat 20: Javanese Gamelan Ensemble, R. Anderson Sutton, director. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 21: Wind Ensemble, Scott Teeple, director. Mills, 2 p.m.

Sun 21: Beethoven Piano Competition Winners. Morphy, 3:30 p.m.

Sun 21: Contemporary Chamber Ensemble, Laura Schwendinger, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Tue 23: Horn Choir, Daniel Grabois, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 24: Opera Workshop. Music Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 26: Chorale, Bruce Gladstone, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 27: All-University String Orchestra, Janet Jensen, conductor. Mills, 4 p.m.

Sat 27 and Sun 28: Choral Union with UW Chamber Orchestra $; Beverly Taylor, conductor (below, in a photo by Katrin Talbot); “The Passion according to Four Evangelists” by Robert Kyr. Mills, 8 p.m. (Sat), 7:30 p.m. (Sun)

Sun 28: University Bands. Mills, 2 p.m.

Mon 29: Masters Singers. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Tue 30: Keyboard Conversations with Jeffrey Siegel (WUT) $; “Listen to the Dance: Waltzes, Marches, Polkas and Tangos!” Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Tue 30: Early Music Ensemble, John Chappell Stowe (below, in a photo by Katrin Talbot), director. Morphy, 8:30 p.m.

MAY

Wed 1: Western Percussion Ensemble, Anthony Di Sanza, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Thu 2: Jazz Orchestra, Johannes Wallmann, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 3: UW Symphony Orchestra, James Smith, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 4: World Percussion Ensemble; Anthony Di Sanza, director. Music Hall, Noon

Sat 4: Women’s Chorus and University Chorus, Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 5: Concert Band; Michael Leckrone, conductor (below). Mills, 2 p.m.

To request a season brochure, call (608) 263-1900.

Web calendar: music.wisc.edu/calendar

Concert Line, recorded weekly: (608) 263-9485

The Digest, e-mailed weekly:  Send request to music@music.wisc.edu

Additional Information

FCS=Faculty Concert Series

GAS=Guest Artist Series

WUT=Wisconsin Union Theater

SOMAA=School of Music Alumni Association

Mills & Morphy Halls are in Mosse Humanities Building, 455 N. Park St.

Music Hall is on North Park St., at the foot of Bascom Hill (clock tower)

Unitarian Meeting House is at 900 University Bay Drive

Pyle Center is at 702 Langdon St.

Luther Memorial Church is at 1021 University Ave.

Tickets (for University Opera, Choral Union and Wisconsin Union Theater) at: Campus Arts Ticketing Office; (608) 265-ARTS;

uniontheater.wisc.edu

In person:  821 University Ave. (street level, east side of Vilas Hall)

By mail only:  800 Langdon St., Madison, WI  53706

Day-of-concert sales in concert hall lobby beginning one hour before program

The Wisconsin Brass Quintet is celebrating its 40th Anniversary Season: Founded in 1972, the Wisconsin Brass Quintet (below, with some former members) is ensemble-in-residence at the UW-Madison School of Music.  The WBQ’s commitment to commissioning and performing new music of the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as its mastery of styles from every musical period, are evident in the group’s distinguished 40-year history of recitals, recordings and outreach events.

For 2012-13, the WBQ will give the premiere performances of works by two of its members:  Hodesanna, by John Stevens, composed in memory of Jeff Hodapp; and Gravikord, by Daniel Grabois.  In addition, it will perform two new pieces for brass quintet and wind ensemble by James Stephenson and Anthony Plog.

Concerts include Faculty Concert Series:  Oct. 19 and March 15; Wind Ensemble (Scott Teeple, conductor):  Oct. 5 and Feb. 23.

Current members are John Aley, trumpet; Jessica Jensen, trumpet; Daniel Grabois, horn (below); Mark Hetzler, trombone; and John Stevens, tuba.

Guest Artist Series showcases Collins Fellows

The School of Music proudly presents the following exceptional musicians who were honored with Paul Collins Fellowships during their graduate studies.  See calendar for dates of their performances.

Edith Hines, violin – Doctor of Music Arts 2008; Elias Goldstein, viola – DMA 2011; Jamie-Rose Guarrine, soprano – DMA 2005; Michelle Malafronte, flute – Master of Music 2008; Dylan Chmura-Moore, trombone – DMA 2011; Eli Kalman, piano – DMA 2006; Kevin McMahon, conductor – DMA 2005; Pavel Morunov, oboe – DMA (in progress); Johanna Bourkova-Morunov, violin – MM 2006; Emily Birsan, soprano (below) – MM 2010; Jamie Van Eyck, mezzo soprano – DMA 2012; and John Arnold, bass-baritone – DMA (in progress).


Classical music: Here is Part 1 of a 2-part schedule of concerts for the new season at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music. Today is the FALL Semester; tomorrow is the SPRING Semester.

August 14, 2012
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By Jacob Stockinger

The season brochures are almost printed and in the mail.

But you can still get out your calendars and datebooks.

The Ear has been given the schedule of concerts by faculty and guest artists at the University of Wisconsin School of Music.

Today, I list events for First or Fall Semester – September through December.

Tomorrow, I will offer the concerts for the Second or Spring Semester

Programs for concerts are not yet available. But you can always check the Events Calendar at www.music.wisc.edu/events

Also, because of building renovations, the Wisconsin Union Theater concerts will take place in Mills Hall.

School of Music, University of Wisconsin-Madison Performances 2012-2013

Calendar of Events

Admission is FREE except where noted by a $

SEPTEMBER

Mon 3: 36th Karp Family (below) Opening Labor Day Concert (FCS) with Suzanne Beia, violin; Katrin Talbot, viola; Parry Karp, violoncello; Christopher Karp, piano; Ariana and Isabel Karp, narrators; Howard and Frances Karp, piano. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Sat 8: Mimmi Fulmer, soprano (FCS); Bruce Bengtson and Martha Fischer, piano; Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 15: Pro Arte Quartet (below in a photo by Rick Langer, FCS), Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 16: School of Music Alumni (SOMAA), Mills, 1:30 p.m.

Sun 16: Paul Rowe, baritone (FCS), Morphy, 4 p.m.

Thu 20: Black Music Ensemble, Richard Davis, director; Morphy, 8:30 p.m.

Sat 22: Areon Flutes (GAS); Morphy, 4 p.m.

Sat 22: Mark Hetzler, trombone (FCS); Vincent Fuh, piano; Nick Moran, bass; Todd Hammes, drums and percussion. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 23: Opera Props Showcase $; Unitarian Meeting House, 3:30 p.m.

Fri 28: Imani Winds, below in a photo by Eddie Collins, (WUT); $; Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 29: Edith Hines, violin (GAS); John Chappell Stowe, harpsichord. Morphy, 8 p.m.

Sun 30: UW Symphony Orchestra, James Smith, conductor. Mills, 2 p.m.

OCTOBER

Tue 2: Wolfgang David, violin (GAS); David Gompper, piano. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 5: Wind Ensemble, Scott Teeple, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 6: UW Chamber Orchestra (below), James Smith, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Mon 8: “An Hawaiian Sound Salon”; Alan Akaka, Hawaiian lap steel guitar; Henry Sapoznik, host; Pyle Center, 5 p.m.

Sat 13: Choral Collage. Mills, 4 p.m.

Sun 14: Concert Band, Scott Teeple, conductor. Mills, 2 p.m.

Sun 14: University Bands, Mills, 4 p.m.

Mon 15: Elias Goldstein, viola (GAS); Thomas Kasdorf, piano. Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

Tue 16: Gerry Pagano, bass trombone (GAS); Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

Tue 16: Keyboard Conversations with Jeffrey Siegel, below) (WUT) $; “Spellbinding Bach.” Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 19: Wisconsin Brass Quintet (below, FCS). Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 20: Linda Bartley, clarinet (FCS); Jessica Johnson, piano. Morphy, 8 p.m.

Thu 25: Stephanie Jutt, flute (FCS); Christopher Taylor, piano. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Thu 25: Jamie-Rose Guarrine, soprano (GAS); Scott Gendel, piano. Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 26: Wind Ensemble Collage. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 27: Pro Arte Quartet (FCS). Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 28: Contemporary Chamber Ensemble (below), Laura Schwendinger, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

NOVEMBER

Thu 1: Wind Ensemble Chamber Winds. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 2: Nathan Wysock, guitar (GAS). Morphy, 8 p.m.

Sat 3: Marc Vallon, bassoon (below, FCS). Morphy, 8 p.m.

VALLON

Sun 4: John Chappell Stowe, harpsichord (FCS). Morphy, 4 p.m.

Mon 5: Project Trio (GAS). Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

Thu 8: Black Music Ensemble, Richard Davis, director. Morphy, 8:30 p.m.

Fri 9, Sun 11 & Tue 13: University Opera with UW Chamber Orchestra and Madrigal Singers $; William Farlow, director; Andrew Sewell, guest conductor (below) from the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra; Bruce Gladstone, chorus master; “Medea,” by Cherubini. Music Hall, 7:30 p.m. (Fri & Tue), 3 p.m. (Sun).

Fri 9: Parry Karp, violoncello (FCS); Howard and Frances Karp, piano. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 10: UW Symphony Orchestra with Joshua Roman (below), violoncello (WUT) $; James Smith, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sun 11: Women’s Chorus and University Chorus. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Mon 12: David Hyunsu Kim, fortepiano (GAS). Morphy, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 14: Tyrone Greive, violin (FCS); Martha Fischer, piano. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 14: Guitar Ensemble, Javier Calderón, director.  Morphy, 8:30 p.m.

Thu 15: Alasdair Fraser, Scottish fiddle (WUT) $; Natalie Haas, cello; Music Hall, 8 p.m.

Fri 16: Concert Choir, Beverly Taylor, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Fri 16: Michelle Malafronte, flute (GAS); Vincent Fuh, piano. Morphy, 8 p.m.

Sat 17: Tuba and Euphonium Ensemble; Matthew Mireles, director. Mills, 4 p.m.

Sat 17: Chorale, Bruce Gladstone, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

Sat 17: Wingra Woodwind Quintet (FCS). Morphy, 8 p.m.

Tue 20: Trombone Choir, Mark Hetzler, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 28: Jazz Orchestra, Johannes Wallmann, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Thu 29: Ninety Miles Project (WUT) $; Music Hall, 8 p.m.

Fri 30: Wind Ensemble, Scott Teeple, director. Mills, 8 p.m.

DECEMBER

Sat 1: All-University String Orchestra, Janet Jensen, conductor. Mills, 4 p.m.

Sun 2: Winter Choral Concerts. Luther Memorial Church, 2 and 4 p.m.

Sun 2: Concert Band, Scott Teeple, conductor. Mills, 2 p.m.

Sun 2: University Bands, Mills, 4 p.m.

Tue 4: Masters Singers. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 5: Opera Workshop. Music Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Wed 5: Western Percussion Ensemble, Anthony Di Sanza, director. Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Fri 7 and Sun 9: Choral Union with UW Symphony Orchestra (below), $; Beverly Taylor, conductor; “A “German” Requiem by Johannes Brahms. Mills, 8 p.m. (Fri), 7:30 p.m. (Sun)

Sat 8: World Percussion Ensemble, Anthony Di Sanza, director. Music Hall, Noon

Sat 8: UW Chamber Orchestra, James Smith, conductor. Mills, 8 p.m.

To request a season brochure, call (608) 263-1900.

Web calendar: music.wisc.edu/calendar

Concert Line, recorded weekly: (608) 263-9485

The Digest, e-mailed weekly:  Send request to music@music.wisc.edu

Additional Information

FCS=Faculty Concert Series

GAS=Guest Artist Series

WUT=Wisconsin Union Theater

SOMAA=School of Music Alumni Association

Mills & Morphy Halls are in Mosse Humanities Building, 455 N. Park St.

Music Hall is on North Park St., at the foot of Bascom Hill (clock tower)

Unitarian Meeting House is at 900 University Bay Drive

Pyle Center is at 702 Langdon St.

Luther Memorial Church is at 1021 University Ave.

Tickets (for University Opera, Choral Union and Wisconsin Union Theater) at: Campus Arts Ticketing Office; (608) 265-ARTS;

uniontheater.wisc.edu

In person:  821 University Ave. (street level, east side of Vilas Hall)

By mail only:  800 Langdon St., Madison, WI  53706

Day-of-concert sales in concert hall lobby beginning one hour before program

This is also the Wisconsin Brass Quintet 40th Anniversary Season: Founded in 1972, the Wisconsin Brass Quintet (below, with some former members) is an ensemble-in-residence at the UW-Madison School of Music.  The WBQ’s commitment to commissioning and performing new music of the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as its mastery of styles from every musical period, are evident in the group’s distinguished 40-year history of recitals, recordings and outreach events.

For 2012-13, the WBQ will give the premiere performances of works by two of its members:  Hodesanna, by John Stevens, composed in memory of Jeff Hodapp; and Gravikord, by Daniel Grabois.  In addition, it will perform two new pieces for brass quintet and wind ensemble by James Stephenson and Anthony Plog.

Concerts include: Faculty Concert Series:  Oct. 19 and March 15

Wind Ensemble (Scott Teeple, conductor):  Oct. 5 and Feb. 23

Current members include John Aley, trumpet; Jessica Jensen, trumpet; Daniel Grabois, horn; Mark Hetzler, trombone; and John Stevens, tuba.

Guest Artist Series showcases Collins Fellows

The School of Music proudly presents the following exceptional musicians who were honored with Paul Collins Fellowships during their graduate studies.  See calendar for dates of their performances.

Edith Hines, violin – Doctor of Music Arts 2008; Elias Goldstein, viola – DMA 2011; Jamie-Rose Guarrine, soprano – DMA 2005; Michelle Malafronte, flute – Master of Music 2008; Dylan Chmura-Moore, trombone – DMA 2011; Eli Kalman, piano – DMA 2006; Kevin McMahon, conductor – DMA 2005; Pavel Morunov, oboe – DMA (in progress); Johanna Bourkova-Morunov, violin – MM 2006; Emily Birsan, soprano  – MM 2010; Jamie Van Eyck, mezzo soprano (below)– DMA 2012; and John Arnold, bass-baritone – DMA (in progress).


Classical music: Let us now praise the young soloists and young composer who will be spotlighted at the University of Wisconsin School of Music’s annual FREE concerto competition concert this Friday night.

February 9, 2012
1 Comment

By Jacob Stockinger

There is something heroic and stirring about a concerto that pits a single soloist against a big orchestra. So student instruments dream of the day and wait a long time for the big chance to perform a concerto.

Concertos are an exciting music genre to play and to hear, as you hear this Friday at 8 p.m. in Mills Hall when the annual FREE UW concerto competition winners will perform with the UW Symphony Orchestra (below, with the UW Choral Union) under James Smith and David Grandis.

I say that as someone who played the piano in a concerto competition when I was 16 (Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Op. 15) and lost to a 12- or 13-year-old who played Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major, K. 488, very beautifully.

When friends find that out, they often said “I’m sorry you lost.”

But they shouldn’t be.

Concerto competitions do much more than declare winners.

In my case, the contest showed me exactly what needed to know: I didn’t have either the talent or temperament for a performing career. And it was better to have learned it sooner rather than later, after I had invested a lot of hard work, time and money in unrealistic fantasies of success.

But these young people at the University of Wisconsin School of Music have been tested in public performance before and I think their credentials speak well for them. The only thing I don’t like is that they perform movements, not entire concertos. But if that weren’t the case, the concert would last much longer.

I also like that singing is included. (That wasn’t the case in my day, as I recall.) And I like that less familiar instruments (like the marimba) get a chance to compete with the piano, strings, winds and brass. Finally, I like the young talent for composition is presented to the public.

It all reflects well on the teachers and teaching. In fact, the students at the UW School of Music just seem to get better and better as the years go by. I haven’t al these winners, but I have heard the piano in an absolutely first-rate and riveting performance of Beethoven’s final sonata, Op. 111 in C minor. So I assume the standards for winning were very high indeed.

Here is the UW press release with complete details

You don’t have to wait until after the concerts to applaud such persistence, hard work and talent.

UW SYMPHONY CONCERT FEATURES COMPETITION WINNERS

The UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of James Smith (below) will present its annual concerto and composition competition winners this Friday at 8 p.m. in Mills Hall.

Admission is FREE and open to the public.

Five students were selected as winners in this year’s competition. Four will perform as soloists with the orchestra: Alice Bartsch, violin; Michael Roemer, baritone; Jeongmin Lee, piano; and Brett Walter, percussion.  In the separate category for composition, Youn-Jae Ok won for “Mi-Ryen,” which will be premiered by the orchestra on this same program.

Alice Bartsch (below) is a sophomore pursuing the Bachelor of Music degree in violin performance and studies with Felicia Moye.  She hails from Bloomington, Minnesota, and Bartsch’s past teachers include Ellen Kim and Young-Nam Kim.  She currently holds scholarships from the School of Music and the School of Music Alumni Association.  In addition to being a full-time student, Bartsch is a member of the first violin section of the Madison Symphony Orchestra and teaches violin privately. In high school, she was a finalist in the Minnesota Youth Symphony concerto competition.  She has participated in both the Northern Lights Chamber Music Institute and the Madeline Island Music Camp. Bartsch’s biggest aspiration is to perform in the pit orchestra of the Metropolitan Opera.  At this concert, she will perform all four movements of Max Bruch’s “Scottish Fantasy.”

Michael Roemer (below) is currently pursuing the Master of Music degree in opera, studying with William Farlow and Julia Faulkner and holding a teaching assistantship in voice. He received the Bachelor of Music degree in voice performance at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, where he studied with Brian Leeper  A native of Brodhead, Wisconsin, he received an Encouragement Award from the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions Wisconsin District in 2011.  In the same year, he performed with the Des Moines Metro Opera as an apprentice artist.  Last fall, he played the role of Marcello in University Opera’s production of “La Bohème” and next month, he will play the title role in the company’s production of Mozart’s “Don Giovanni.” For the symphony program, Roemer will perform “Hai già vinta la causa . . . Vedrò mentre io sospiro” from “Le nozze de Figaro” by Mozart.  

Jeongmin Lee (below) is pursuing the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in piano performance and pedagogy, studying with Todd Welbourne and Jessica Johnson.  Originally from Seoul, Korea, she received the Bachelor of Music degree from Seoul National University, where she studied with Nakho Paik and Haesun Paik. She earned an artist diploma in piano performance at Oberlin Conservatory studying with Haewon Song and the Master of Music degree in piano performance and pedagogy at Northwestern University studying with Alan Chow and Marcia Bosits.  Lee is the recipient of the Perlman Trio scholarship from the School of Music.  She previously taught piano at Yanbian University of Science and Technology and music at Yanbian International Academy in China. Lee will perform the first movement (Allegro moderato) of Beethoven’s “Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major,” Op. 58.

Brett Walter is pursuing the Master of Music degree in percussion performance, studying with Anthony Di Sanza.  Originally from Grafton, Wisconsin, he received the Bachelor of Music degree in percussion performance from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, where he studied with Cheryl Grosso. He previously studied with Tom Fischer. Walter was a member of the 2007 Colts Drum and Bugle Corps and won second place in the Green Bay Civic Symphony Concerto Competition  In addition, he is a freelance musician and an active sectional coach with the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra. Walter will perform “Prism Rhapsody for Marimba and Orchestra” by Keiko Abe.

Youn-Jae Ok (below) is a candidate for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in composition and has studied with Stephen Dembski and Laura Schwendinger.  His early schooling was in Korea and England and he completed the International Baccalaureate at the Chateau du Rosey in Switzerland.  Ok holds the Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music and the Master of Music degree from Roosevelt University’s Chicago College of the Performing Arts. His teachers include Stacy Garrop, Daron Hagen, Joel Hoffman, Michael Fiday and Mara Helmuth.  Ok was the winner of the 2007-08 Roosevelt Wind Ensemble Competition for “Audacity” and was a regional winner of the 2008 SCI/ASCAP student composition competition for “Zest for Olive Salad.”  He is a repeat winner of the School of Music’s composition competition, having won in 2009 for “Vacillation.”  

Ok’s program notes begin, “The title of the piece, ‘Mi-Ryen,’ is an emotional state that describes a mixture of the following feelings: longing, nostalgia, lingering, regret and hovering. . . .  Mi-Ryen is perhaps a piece that describes an emotional state rather than expressing it, opening possibilities for audiences to link the described emotion to their current emotional state.  In other words, its intention is to evoke the listener’s emotions and not to impose emotion of my own.”

The new work will be performed under the direction of graduate assistant conductor David Grandis (below). Grandis will also open the concert with the Overture to Verdi’s “La forza del destino.”

A free public reception for musicians and audience will follow in Mills Hall lobby, sponsored by the School of Music Alumni Association. Mills Hall is located in the Mosse Humanities Building on the UW-Madison campus, at the corner of Park Street and University Avenue.


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