The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: New music and old music meet in a benefit concert this Saturday night for the Art+Literature Lab of Madison

March 23, 2017
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Ear received the following information from Eric Miller to pass along:

Thanks for sharing my recital at the First Unitarian Society of Madison last week. I really appreciate what you do.

I’m repeating the program of unaccompanied music for viola da gamba at the Arts+Literature Lab (below) on this Saturday, March 25, at 8 p.m.

Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are $10 in advance, $15 at the door.

I’ll be playing the first suite by Le Sieur de Machy and the Sonata VI by Johannes Schenk from his collection “L’echo du Danube,” (Echo of the Danube), as well as a few other smaller pieces. (Below is Eric Miller, who also performs a Prelude to a suite by Le Seiur de Machy in the YouTube video at bottom.)

In addition to my set, my idea was to juxtapose this music I love with music that is equally intricate and beautiful, but from different sound worlds and traditions.

Milwaukee cellist Patrick Reinholz (below top) will be playing modern pieces by Italian composer Luciano Berio (below middle) and Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho (below bottom) as well as one of his own compositions from a solo recording he is releasing.

Finally, cellist/composer/multi-instrumentalist Brian Grimm (below) will be presenting some of his own compositions and improvisations.

The Facebook event page is here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1384611978280528/

Advanced tickets are available here: http://ericmiller.bpt.me/

The Arts+Literature Lab (A+LL) is at 2021 Winnebago Street, on the east side of Madison. It is really doing exciting things for the community.


Classical music: This weekend sees vocal music, band music, woodwind music and orchestral music at the UW-Madison. Plus, a FREE concert of early music for viola da gamba is on Friday at noon

March 9, 2017
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ALERT: This week’s FREE Friday Noon Musicale at the First Unitarian Society of Madison, 900 University Bay Drive, features Eric Miller (below) playing early music for viola da gamba by Le Sieur de Machy, Johann Schenk and Carl Abel. The concert runs from 12:15 to 1 p.m.

By Jacob Stockinger

This week brings four major public events at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music: one on Friday; two on Saturday; and one on Sunday.

VOCAL MUSIC

On Friday at 5:30 p.m. in Morphy Hall, the students in the studio of soprano and UW-Madison voice professor Mimmi Fulmer (below) will present a FREE concert. Sorry, no word on the program.

For more information, go to: http://www.music.wisc.edu/event/mimmi-fulmer-studio-recital/

WOODWIND-PIANO WINNERS

On Saturday at 4 p.m. in Morphy Hall the four winners of the annual Irving Shain Wood-Piano Duo Competition will give a FREE recital.

The pairs of winners are: bassoonist Chia-Yu Hsu with pianist Kangwoo Jin; and bassoonist Eleni Katz with pianist Rayna Slavova.

The program features music by Noël-Gallon (1891-1966); Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013); Gabriel Grovlez (1979-1944); Eugène Bourdeau (1850-1926); Robert Schumann (1810-1856); Gabriel Pierne (1863-1937); Eugène Bourdeau (1850-1926); and Charles Koechlin (1867-1950)

For more information, including the works on the program and biographies of the performers, go to:

http://www.music.wisc.edu/event/irving-shain-woodwind-piano-duo-winners-recital-2/

BAND MUSIC

On Saturday at 5 p.m. in Mills Hall, there is a FREE concert by University Bands. Conductors are Darin Olson (below), Nathan Froebe and Justin Lindgre. Sorry, no word on the program.

ORCHESTRAL MUSIC

Sunday at 8 p.m. in Mills Hall, the UW Symphony Orchestra will perform with soloist and UW-Madison alumnus, bassoonist Anthony Georgeson  who is Principal Bassoon of the Florida Orchestra. Retiring UW-Madison professor James Smith (below top) will conduct, but the former clarinetist will NOT be a featured performer.

The program is:

Concerto for Bassoon Concerto in B-Flat Major, K. 191, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart with alumnus Anthony Georgeson (below bottom) as bassoon soloist. (You can hear Anthony Georgeson talk about music and the cadenzas in Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto in the YouTube video at the bottom.)

“Un Sourire pour Orchestra” (A Smile for Orchestra) by Olivier Messiaen

“Scheherazade” by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

For more information, go to:

http://www.music.wisc.edu/event/uw-symphony-orchestra-5/


Classical music: The Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble excels again in a varied program of rarely heard Baroque vocal and instrumental music

November 30, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

Here is a special posting, a review written by frequent guest critic and writer for this blog, John W. Barker. Barker (below) is an emeritus professor of Medieval history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also is a well-known classical music critic who writes for Isthmus and the American Record Guide, and who hosts an early music show once a month on Sunday morning on WORT-FM 89.9.  For years, he served on the Board of Advisors for the Madison Early Music Festival and frequently gives pre-concert lectures in Madison.

John-Barker

By John W. Barker

The Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble offered its latest specimen of intimate Baroque chamber music at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church on Regent Street last Sunday afternoon.

As always, each of the performers—six in this case—had one or two opportunities as soloist.

wbe-st-andrews-11-27-16

Mezzo-soprano Consuelo Sañudo (below), for instance, was featured in two solo cantatas.

One, by Giovanni Bononcini was on conventional emotional themes.

But the other was a real curiosity. By the French composer Louis-Nicolas Clérambault, it was written for the Nativity season, and has been given a French title as “Hymn of the Angels.” But its text was no more or less than the Latin words of the Gloria section of the Mass Ordinary.

wbe-mezzo-consuelo-sanudo

A new member in the group, recorder player Sigrun Paust (below), delivered the Sonata No. 1 from a 1716 collection of works written by Francesco Veracini alternatively for violin or flute.

wbe-sigrun-paust

For flutist Monica Steger (below) the vehicle was a Sonata Op. 91, No. 2, for Flute and Harpsichord duo, by Joseph Bodin de Boismortier.

wbe-monica-steger

The spotlight was on viola da gambist Eric Miller (below) in another duo with harpsichord, no less than the Sonata in D Major, BWV 1028, by Johann Sebastian Bach, but Miller also participated in continuo functions elsewhere. (You can hear the Bach sonata in the YouTube video at the bottom.)

wbe-eric-miller

Likewise active in continuo work was viola da gambist Anton TenWolde (below), but he had one solo, a Capriccio for cello, by Joseph Ferdinand Dall’Abaco.

wbe-anton-tenwolde

And the harpsichordist Max Yount (below), also involved in continuo roles, presented two contrasting keyboard pieces, a Toccata by Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck and a Fantasie by Johann Jakob Froberger.

wbe-max-yount

For a colorful finale, Paust and Miller joined TenWolde and Steger (on harpsichord) in a Trio Sonata in F by Georg Philipp Telemann.

The artistry of these performers (below) was fully up to their own high standards, and their delight in trading off assignments to play together is palpable.

wbe-telemann-trio-sonata

St. Andrew’s Church (below) on Regent Street may have been a bit bigger than a Baroque salon or parlor, but still served well as a setting for this kind of amiable gentility in musical substance.

St. Andrew's Episcopal Madison Front

The group’s next Madison concert is at St. Andrew’s on Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017. No program has been announced.


Classical music: The Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble performs a varied program of French, German, Italian and Dutch music on Sunday afternoon

November 23, 2016
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ALERT: There will NOT be a Noon Musicale this Friday at the First Unitarian Society of Madison. The weekly series resumes next week.

By Jacob Stockinger

The Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble will perform a very varied concert of baroque chamber music on this coming Sunday, Nov. 27, at 3 p.m. at Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church (below), 1833 Regent Street, on the near west side of Madison.

St. Andrew's Episcopal Madison Front

St. Andrew's Church interior

Members of the ensemble include Eric Miller, viola da gamba; Sigrun Paust, recorder; Consuelo Sañudo, mezzo-soprano; Monica Steger, traverso flute, harpsichord; Anton TenWolde, baroque cello; and Max Yount, harpsichord.

Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble composite

Tickets at the door only are $20 for the public, $10 for students.

For more information, visit www.wisconsinbaroque.org

A reception will be held at 2422 Kendall Ave, second floor after the concert.

The program includes:

Johann Sebastian Bach – Sonata for viola da gamba and harpsichord in D major, BWV 1028

Francesco Maria Veracini (below) – Sonata No. 1 for recorder and basso continuo in F major

Jan Peterszoon Sweelinck, Toccata in C

Johann Jakob Froberger, Fantasie

Giovanni Bononcini, “Vorrei pure pianger”

francesco-maria-veracini

Intermission

Joseph de Bodin de Boismortier – Sonata for flute and harpsichord, Opus 91, No. 2

Francois Couperin – “Le Dodo ou l’Amour au Berceau”

Evaristo Felice Dall’Abaco – Capriccio for solo violoncello No.

Louis-Nicholas Clerembault – Hymne des Anges

Georg Philipp TelemannTrio sonata for recorder, viola da gamba, and basso continuo, TWV 42:F3 (heard in the YouTube video below)


Classical music: The Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble opens its new season with rarities beautifully performed

October 18, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

Here is a special posting, a review written by frequent guest critic and writer for this blog, John W. Barker. Barker (below) is an emeritus professor of Medieval history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also is a well-known classical music critic who writes for Isthmus and the American Record Guide, and who hosts an early music show once a month on Sunday morning for WORT-FM 89.9. For years, he served on the Board of Advisors for the Madison Early Music Festival and frequently gives pre-concert lectures in Madison. Barker also took the performance photos in the review.

John-Barker

By John W. Barker

The season opener for the Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble was held last Saturday night at the historic Gates of Heaven Synagogue, in James Madison Park on East Gorham Street.

Gates of Heaven

An unusual feature of the program this time was a kind of running backbone: the music of the little-known 18th-century French composer Benoît Guilemant.

From a collection of duo miniatures for flute and violin, six short pieces were sprinkled through the program. There was also a larger work of his, a Quartet Sonata, Op. 1, No. 3, for two flutes and violin with basso continuo. All these were spirited, clever and imaginative pieces that greatly delighted the audience.

wbe-instrumentalists-oct-2016-jwb

The French Baroque was further represented by a cantata by François Bouvard (1684-1760), sung by mezzo-soprano Consuelo Sañudo, with flutist Brett Lipshutz and violinist Nathan Giglierano taking obligato parts.

The other veteran singer involved, soprano Mimmi Fulmer, delivered a pungent Italian mini-cantata by Barbara Strozzi (1619-1677).

wbe-with-two-singers-oct-2016-jwb

And, from the German Baroque scene, there was a fine Trio Sonata, Op. 1, No. 2, by the great Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707). You can hear it in the YouTube video at the bottom.

The earliest music in the program was provided by Claudio Monteverdi: first, the delicious concertato madrigal, “Chiome doro” from the Seventh Book (1619); then three delightful pieces from the earlier Scherzi Musicali of 1607.

The ensemble this time consisted of eight performers. Besides the two singers and the two instrumentalists named, there were regulars like Eric Miller (viola da gamba), Monica Steger (flute, recorder, harpsichord), Anton TenWolde (cello), and Max Yount (harpsichord). Violinist Giglierano is a new presence in the group, and it seems as if he will be returning to the fold later this season.

wbe-all-players-and-singers-oct-2016-jwb

One hates to think that the audience was somewhat smallish due to football. But it was a lively and—as always and justly—an appreciative one.


Classical music: Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble performs works by less well-known composers this Saturday night

October 14, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

Fans of Baroque music can take their experience beyond such standard fare as Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi and George Frideric Handel if they attend a concert this weekend by the veteran Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble, which has long used period instruments and historically informed performance practices.

The WBE concert of Baroque chamber music is this Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Gates of Heaven Synagogue, 300 East Gorham Street, in James Madison Park in downtown Madison.

Gates of Heaven

PLEASE NOTE: There is a Badger Football game on Saturday, so it may take a little longer than usual to get to the Gates of Heaven.

Members of the Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble (below) include: Mimmi Fulmer, soprano; Nathan Giglierano, baroque violin; Brett Lipshutz, traverse and recorder; Eric Miller, viola da gamba; Consuelo Sañudo, mezzo-soprano; Monica Steger, traverso, recorder and harpsichord; Anton TenWolde, baroque cello; and Max Yount, harpsichord.

Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble 2014

Tickets at the door only: $20 for adults, $10 for students.

Here is the program:

  1. Benoît Guillemant (fl. 1746-1757)  – Preludio in D Major, from: Trois Suites d’airs harmonieux et chantant pour la flûte traversière avec un accompagnement de violon obligé (1757-1760)
  2. Barbara Strozzi (below, 1619-1677)  “L’Eraclito Amoroso”
  3. Benoît Guillemant – Marche in D Major
  4. Dieterich Buxtehude (1637/39-1707)   Sonata for violin, gamba and cembalo, Opus 1, No. 2
  5. Benoît Guillemant – Aria Gratioso in D Major
  6. Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643) “Chiome d’Oro”

barbara strozzi

INTERMISSION

  1. Benoît Guillemant – Tambourino 10 in D Major
  2. François Bouvard (1684-1760)  Enigme – cantata à voix seule avec accompaniment de violon, flute et la basse continue
  3. Benoît Guillemant – Amoroso in D Major
  4. Benoît Guillemant – Sonate en quatuor pour deux flûtes, un violon oblige et la basse continue, Opus 1, No. 3
  5. Benoît Guillemant – Tambourino 20 in d minor
  6. Claudio Monteverdi (below) from: Scherzi Musicali a tre voci, Venice 1607; “Lidia spina del mio core”;  “Dolci miei”; “Damigella tutta bella”

Monteverdi 2

For more information: 238 5126, email: info@wisconsinbaroque.org, or visit www.wisconsinbaroque.org

A reception will be held at 2422 Kendall Ave., second floor, after the concert.

Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble composite

 


Classical music: The Madison Bach Musicians perform Baroque and Renaissance English music this coming Friday night and Sunday afternoon

October 3, 2016
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ALERT: The strike by the players in the Philadelphia Orchestra has been settled. For details, go to this website:

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20161003_Philadelphia_Orchestra_strike_ends__contract_vote_73-11.html

For more background about that strike and others, which The Ear writes about yesterday, go to:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2016/10/02/classical-music-the-pittsburgh-and-philadelphia-symphony-orchestras-start-their-seasons-with-a-strike-by-the-players/

By Jacob Stockinger

The Madison Bach Musicians will open its 2016-17 season this coming weekend with two performances of a program that features English music from the Baroque and Renaissance eras.

mbm-2016

The first performance is this Friday, Oct. 7, at 7:30 p.m., preceded by 6:45 lecture, in the Atrium Auditorium (below, in a photo by Zane Williams) of the First Unitarian Society of Madison, 900 University Bay Drive.

FUS Atrium, Auditorium Zane Williams

The second is this coming Sunday, Oct. 9, at 3:30 p.m., preceded by a 2:45 lecture, at the Holy Wisdom Monastery (below), 4200 County Highway M in Middleton.

Holy Wisdom Monastery interior

If bought in advance, tickets are $28 for the general public and $23 for students and seniors over 65; at the door tickets will be $30 and $25, respectively. Student rush tickets are $10, require a student ID and are available 30 minutes before the lectures. For more information, visit www.madisonbachmusicians.org

The program features: Sonata in Four Parts in F major “Golden Sonata” by  Henry Purcell (1659−1695); Suite No. 2 in D major from “Consort of Four Parts” by Matthew Locke (c. 1621−1677); Songs to texts by William Shakespeare by Robert Johnson (1583−1633); “Diverse bizzarie Spra La Vecchia” by Nicola Matteis (c. 1650−c. 1709); Division No. 7 for two bass viols by Christopher Simpson (c. 1606−1669); “Solus cum sola” for solo lute solo  by John Dowland (1563−1626); “The Broken Consort” Part 1, Suite no. 2 in G major by Matthew Locke; “The Carman’s Whistle” by William Byrd (c. 1540−1623); “Light of Love” by Anonymous as arranged by David Douglass; “John Come Kiss Me Now” by John Playford (1623−c. 1686) as arranged by David Douglass; “Long Cold Night” and “Queen’s Jig.”

Performers include: Dann Coakwell, tenor; David Walker, lute and theorbo; Kangwon Kim violin and concertmaster; Brandi Berry, violin; Anna Steinhoff and Martha Vallon, viola de gamba; and Trevor Stephenson, harpsichord.

mbm-playing-2016

PROGRAM NOTES

Here are some edited notes by MBM founder and director Trevor Stephenson (below):

Madison Bach Musicians is delighted to start off its 13th season with a foray into new repertoire for the group: English music from the Renaissance and Baroque.

A special feature of the program will be the recognition in song of the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare (1564-1616).

Both the smaller lute and the larger theorbo were considered ideal for accompanying the voice in songs, and the theorbo could project a bit better in larger ensembles.

Like the lute, the viola da gamba is also fretted, but it is bowed and not plucked. Moreover, the gamba is held between the legs, the “gams,” and its name literally means “viol of the legs.”

MBM Trevor Stephenson at Immanuel concertos

The baroque violins we’ll use in this program will be strung in the usual fashion of the 16th and 17th centuries, that is, with gut strings (from dried sheep intestine); and the bows will be of the Elizabethan “short” variety (shorter length, and with the stick arching away from the hair), which make them ideally suited for the intricate articulations and lively dance rhythms of this repertoire.

All of these instruments enjoyed great popularity in England during the 16th and 17th centuries.

Henry Purcell (below) flourished during the arts boom of the Restoration period under King Charles II and is widely known for his theater music and operas. However, he also wrote quite a bit of instrumental music.

The four parts of this sonata refers here not to numbers of movements, but to the number of simultaneous instrumental lines—in this case, four, which is notably different from the typical three-part (or trio sonata) Italianate texture of the 17th century.

purcell

The Purcell sonata is followed by an instrumental Suite in D major by Matthew Locke (c. 1621-1677). Locke was a close friend of the Purcell family and in particular of Purcell’s father, Henry Purcell Sr. The younger Henry Purcell wrote a musical elegy on Locke’s death in 1677.

Locke’s years of greatest musical activity in London began as the period of Puritanical Commonwealth rule, under Oliver Cromwell, was waning in the late 1650’s. The Commonwealth had severely restricted the theater and the arts in general. Fun fact: Locke (below) was the first composer to indicate a musical crescendo and decrescendo in a score.

matthew-locke

The texts for the songs are from various Elizabethan poets—John Fletcher, John Webster and Shakespeare himself—and all of the music was composed by lutenist Robert Johnson (below, 1583-1633).

Johnson worked closely with Shakespeare in theatrical productions at the court of James I during the first few years of the 17th century. Johnson even provided music for Shakespeare’s original production of “The Tempest.”

robert-johnson-lute

The first part of the MBM program will conclude with two works that explore a favorite 17th-century technique of ornamentation over a repeated bass line, sometimes called a ground bass or chaconne.

The first is by the Italian virtuoso violinist Nicola Matteis (below, in a painting by Gottfried Kneller, c. 1650-1709), who enjoyed a successful career in London during an era when the English were importing Italian music masters by the dozens.

nicola-matteis-by-godfrey-kneller

The second work, by Christopher Simpson (below, c. 1606-1669), explores “divisions” or variations tossed back and forth between two bass viols (gambas) while they simultaneously repeat a ground bass.

christopher-simpson

The second half of the program will feature songs for tenor and voice by John Dowland (below). We’ll also play Locke’s Broken Consort, “broken” meaning “mixed”–in that violins and gambas, which were considered in Elizabethan times to be artistically quite different instruments—were being asked by the composer to play nicely together.

John Dowland

Following that, I’ll play a rousing set of variations for harpsichord, “The Carman’s Whistle,” by William Byrd (below).

William Byrd

And to conclude the program, the consort will play a set of sprightly dances originally published in 1651 in the collection “The English Dancing Master” by John Playford (below).

john-playford

 


Classical music: The superb final concert of the Madison Early Music Festival took the audience through an Elizabethan day with inventive fun

July 20, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

You have to hand it to early music advocate, scholar, conductor and performer Grant Herreid (below), who once again was a major player in the 17th annual Madison Early Music Festival, which wrapped up this past Saturday night.

MEMF 2016 all-festival Grant Herreid

What could have been a scissors-and-paste job to wrap up the celebration of music in Shakespeare and Elizabethan England was turned by the creative Herreid into an event that was thoroughly enjoyable and thoroughly inventive.

What the final All-Festival Concert did was to bring together what seemed a very large number of students, faculty and guest performers.

MEMF 2016 all-festival all forces

Then what the combined forces did was offer a sampler of a typical Elizabethan day. That day included the usual routines from waking up, exercising and going to bed, but also included prayers, romance and entertainment.

It used snippets from plays by William Shakespeare (below) and snippets by many composers of the period including Thomas Tomkins, Anthony Holborne, Thomas Morley, Orlando Gibbons, Thomas Weelkes, John Bennet, John Coperario, Thomas Ravenscroft, John Dowland and Thomas Tallis as well an anonymous composers and reconstructions.

shakespeare BW

The formula must have appealed because it drew a large and enthusiastic audience.

Since it was such an ensemble effort, it is difficult to single out individuals for praise or criticism.

Instead, The Ear simply wants to mention a few of his favorite things with photos to illustrate them.

Here is what The Ear liked:

He liked that the entire 90-minute program of sacred and secular music was done without an intermission. Once you were in the zone, you didn’t have to leave it and then have to get back into it. Plus, the unity of the day was preserved.

He liked the diverse and always highly accomplished singing.

He liked seeing the unusual period string and wind instruments that are beautiful as well as useful.

MEMF 2016 all-festival strings left

He liked how the entire hall, not just the main stage, was used, including the balconies from which a fanfare opened the concert:

MEMF 2016 all-festival balcony

He liked the many “actors” who stepped to the edge of the Mills Hall stage and did an exceptional job reading the excerpts of Shakespeare that were kept short and to the point:

MEMF 2016 all-festival Shakespeare reader

He liked the period and very energetic dancing with handkerchiefs and leg bells:

MEMF 2016 all-festival dancing

There was more. But you get the idea.

Once again, if you can’t make it to other concerts in the Madison Early Music Festival’s annual week-long schedule, try to make it to the impressive All-Festival Concert at the end.

In 17 years, it has never disappointed.

That is a record to be envied and praised.


Classical music: The Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble will perform music by Vivaldi, Handel, Telemann, Corelli, Couperin and Rameau this Sunday afternoon.

February 27, 2016
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ALERT: Tomorrow afternoon, Sunday, Feb. 28, at 3:30 pm. in Morphy Recital Hall, the winners of the Woodwind-Piano Competition sponsored by Irving Shain, emeritus chancellor of the UW-Madison and a distinguished chemist, will perform a FREE recital. The program includes music for oboe and bassoon by Francis Poulenc, Robert Schumann, Gabriel Pierne and others. For more information, visit:

http://www.music.wisc.edu/event/irving-shain-woodwind-piano-duo-winners-recital/

By Jacob Stockinger

Friends of The Ear — who wishes that early music groups and others would provide English translations of German, French and Italian titles for the general public — have sent him the following note:

“The Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble invites you to a concert of baroque chamber music on this Sunday, Feb. 28, at 3 p.m. in Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church (below, exterior and interior), 1833 Regent Street, Madison.

St. Andrew's Episcopal Madison Front

St. Andrew's Church interior

Performers includes: UW-Madison professor Mimmi Fulmer – soprano; Nathan Giglierano – baroque violin; Eric Miller – viola da gamba, baroque cello; Consuelo Sañudo – mezzo-soprano; Monica Steger – traverso, harpsichord; Anton TenWolde – baroque cello; and Max Yount – harpsichord

Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble composite

Tickets at the door are $20, $10 for students.

For more information: call 608 238-5126, or write an email to info@wisconsinbaroque.org, or visit www.wisconsinbaroque.org

The varied program is:

Georg Philipp Telemann – “Ihr Völker, hört” from “Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst” (1725/26)

Jean-Philippe Rameau – “Pièces de Clavecin en Concerts,” “Deuxième Concert”

Georg Friedrich Handel – “Occhi miei, che faceste” HWV 146

Intermission

Arcangelo Corelli – Sonata for Violin and Basso Continuo, Op. 5, No. 11 (heard at bottom in a YouTube video)

Antonio Vivaldi – “Di verde ulivo” from “Tito Manlio” (1719)

Francois Couperin – “Les Nations,” Quatrième Ordre

There will be a reception at our studio at 2422 Kendall Ave (second floor) immediately following the concert.

 


Classical music: The Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble explored neglected virtuosic Baroque music with artistry and enterprise.

December 3, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

Here is a special posting, a review written by frequent guest critic and writer for this blog, John W. Barker. Barker (below) is an emeritus professor of Medieval history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also is a well-known classical music critic who writes for Isthmus and the American Record Guide, and who for 12 years hosted an early music show every other Sunday morning on WORT-FM 89.9 FM. He serves on the Board of Advisors for the Madison Early Music Festival and frequently gives pre-concert lectures in Madison.

John-Barker

By John W. Barker

The latest concert by the Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble was held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal church on Regent Street, on last Sunday afternoon.

The familiar members of the group were mezzo-soprano Consuelo Sañudo; Brett Lipshutz, flute; Monica Steger, recorder, flute and harpsichord; Eric Mills, viola da gamba; Anton TenWolde, cello; and Max Yount, harpsichord. As usual, most had at least one solo appearance and all participated in one or more ensembles. (NOTE: Performance photos are by John W. Barker.)

Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble DEc 2015 JWB

The music that was performed might be divided into four categories.

One was vocal. In each half of the program, Sañudo brought her dramatic flair to two Italian cantatas by George Frideric Handel: Nel dolce dell’oblio and Mi palpita il cor.

In the second category, there were two works for unaccompanied low stringed instrument. TenWolde opened the first half with a ricercata by Giovanni Batista deli Antonii (1636-1689), one of the earlier published pieces for violoncello.

Wisconsin Barique Ensemble Anton ten Wolde Nov 2015 JWB

Miller (below) closed the first half with one of the earliest published works for gamba, a Suite by one M. de Machy (later 17th century). Further on, Yount played a harpsichord Suite by Georg Böhm (1661-1733).

Eric Miller Nov 2015 JWB

Representing a third category, Lipshutz played a Sonata for traverso flute by Johann Philipp Kirnberger (1721-1783).

The second half was framed by two ensemble sets, which constituted the fourth category. One was the Second of the Concerts royaux by François Couperin (1668-1733), played by flute, gamba, and harpsichord. (You can hear the Couperin suite in a YouTube video at the bottom.)

The other was a quadro, or French Quartet, by Georg Phillip Telemann (1681-1767), for two flutes and cello with continuo, delivered by all five instrumentalists.

Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble Consuelo Sanuda, Monica Steger JWB

Plainly, the menu was a varied one, full of individually interesting and appealing music. All of it required not only informed musicianship from the performers but also considerable virtuosity.

It must always be remembered that the Wisconsin Baroque Ensemble, founded in 1990 by Ten Wolde, is the oldest still operating organization in Madison devoted to early music.

It remains outstanding in its artistry and enterprise.

 


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