The Well-Tempered Ear

Classical music: Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society announces its upcoming summer season of “Alphabet Soup” this June

March 18, 2017
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By Jacob Stockinger

The time for announcing new seasons has arrived.

Pretty soon, over the next several weeks and months, The Ear will hear from larger and smaller presenters and ensembles in the Madison area, and post their new seasons.

First out of the gate is the critically acclaimed and popular summer group, the Madison-based Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society. (You can see a short promo video about BDDS on the YouTube video at the bottom.)

It has just announced its upcoming summer season this June, and sent out brochures with the season’s details.

This will be the 26th annual summer season and it has the theme of “Alphabet Soup.”

The concept is explained online and in a brochure newsletter (also online) in an editorial essay by BDDS co-founder and co-artistic director flutist Stephanie Jutt (seen below with co-founder and co-director pianist Jeffrey Sykes).

By the way, Jutt is retiring from the UW-Madison this spring but will continue to play principal flute with the Madison Symphony Orchestra and to work and perform with BDDS.

In many ways it will be a typical season of the eclectic group. It will feature local and imported artists. Many of both are favorites of The Ear.

His local favorites include UW-Madison pianist Christopher Taylor; violist Sally Chisholm of the UW-Madison’s Pro Arte Quartet; UW violinist Soh-Hyun Park Altino (below top, in a photo by Caroline Bittencourt); and Pro Arte cellist Parry Karp (below bottom).

Among The Ear’s favorite guest artists are violinist Carmit Zori, clarinetist Alan Kay, the San Francisco Piano Trio (below top); UW alumna soprano Emily Birsan; pianist Randall Hodgkinson; and baritone Timothy Jones (below bottom).

As usual, the season features 12 concerts of six programs over three weeks (June 9-25) in three venues – the Playhouse in the Overture Center (below top), the Hillside Theater (below middle) at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin compound in Spring Green and the Stoughton Opera House (below bottom).

In addition, there is a FREE family concert in the Overture Playhouse on June 10.

What does seem somewhat new is the number of unknown composers and an edgier, more adventurous choice of pieces, including more new music and more neglected composers.

Oh, there will be classics by such composers as Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Luigi Boccherini, Franz Schubert, Johannes Brahms, Peter Tchaikovsky, Sergei Prokofiev, Maurice Ravel, Bela Bartok, Arnold Schoenberg, Benjamin Britten and others. These are the ABC’s of the alphabet soup, according to BDDS.

But also represented are composers such as Philippe Gaubert, Czech Holocaust victim Gideon Klein (below), Guillaume Conneson, Carl Czerny, Paul Moravec and Franz Doppler. These are the XYZ’s of the alphabet soup.

In between come others. Contemporary American composer, and Pulitzer Prize winner, Kevin Puts (below) is a BDDS favorite and is well represented. You will also find less performed works by Ned Rorem, Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Gerald Finzi.

For the complete programs and schedules as well as the list of performers, some YouTube videos and ticket prices, both for season tickets ($109.50, $146, $182 and $219) and for individual concerts ($43), and other information, go to:

http://bachdancinganddynamite.org/concerts/festival-concerts/


Classical music: A world premiere and outstanding performances bode well for the 25th anniversary season of the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society.

June 13, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

Here is a special posting, a review written by frequent guest critic and writer for this blog, John W. Barker. Barker (below) is an emeritus professor of Medieval history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also is a well-known classical music critic who writes for Isthmus and the American Record Guide, and who for 12 years hosted an early music show every other Sunday morning on WORT FM 89.9 FM. He serves on the Board of Advisors for the Madison Early Music Festival and frequently gives pre-concert lectures in Madison. Performance photos are by Margaret Barker.

John-Barker

By John W. Barker

The Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society is now into its 25th anniversary season, its Silver Jubilee. It opened last Friday at the Stoughton Opera House with a program of Kevin Puts, Joseph Haydn, Franz Schubert, Maurice Ravel and Gabriel Fauré.

BDDS 25th poster

I attended the second program, given at the Overture Center’s Playhouse on Saturday night.

The distinctive feature of that program was the official world premiere of a song cycle by Kevin Puts, the American composer with whom the BDDS folks have been forging a close friendship. Indeed, the ensemble is a co-commissioner of this cycle.

The work in question is In at the Eye: Six Love Songs on Yeats’ Poetry. The composer himself (below) was on hand to introduce this.

Kevin Puts BDDS Margaret Barker

It was then performed by bass-baritone Timothy Jones, with a quartet of flute (Stephanie Jutt), Violin (Stephanie Sant’Ambrogio), viola (Sally Chisholm), cello (Kenneth Olsen), and piano (Jeffrey Sykes).

The poems are varied in character, most of them in free form, and Puts has responded to them with a flexibility of vocal line that closely inflects the words. Only the last poem is in rhyming strophes, and there Puts is able to develop a lyricism that brings the cycle to a warm conclusion. The instruments add a mixture of accompaniment and commentary, and their work was done handsomely.

Jones himself (below, with the quartet), who has a suave and mellow voice, showed notable sensitivity to words and diction in an ideal performance. This cycle’s future is still to be seen, but it holds good prospects for being taken up by singers and players around the country, especially given Puts’ enhanced reputation as a recent Pulitzer Prize winner.

Timothy Jones sings Puts BDDS 2016 Margaret Barker

The concert opened with a transcription of a Mozart piano sonata (K. 570) for transcribed flute, violin, viola and cello (below). It was a strange choice, since Mozart left us four flute quartets of his own devising. Still, it was delivered with flair and polish.

BDDS 2016 Mozart Flute Quartet Margaret Barker

The grand finale was the Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25, for violin, viola, cello and piano by Johannes Brahms. (Much was made of the appropriateness of an Op. 25 masterpiece to mark the silver anniversary.)

Like so much of Brahms’ music, this is brawny, muscular stuff. The four players (below) responded with appropriate energy, matched by a wonderful intensity of feeling.

BDDS 2016 Brahms Piano Quartet 1 Margaret Barker

The fast sections of the “Hungarian Rondo” finale — which you can hear with pianist Leif Ove Andsnes in a YouTube video at the bottom — were brought off at a truly breakneck speed, without missing a note.

I must say, too, that, as I listened to Sykes in his role, it struck me that the piano part in the slow (third) movement could almost be played by itself as an independent keyboard piece. Brahms was, after all, a strong hand at the piano, and had himself in mind in what he wrote for the instrument.

This was a performance that allowed you to get so much out of this score at just one sitting.

As always, the BDDS programs are stimulating and wonderfully brought off. The concerts this coming weekend feature music by Franz Schubert, Joseph Haydn, Maurice Ravel, Arnold Schoenberg, and Astor Piazzolla, among others.

For details, visit:

http://www.bachdancinganddynamite.org/schedule.php

And there is a third week after that — of which, more to follow.


Classical music: What makes the 25th anniversary season of the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society special? The three-week annual summer season opens this Friday night and runs for the next three weekends in Madison, Stoughton and Spring Green.

June 7, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

The big classical music event this week is the opening of the 25th anniversary season of the Madison-based Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society.

BDDS 25th poster

It was co-founded and is still co-directed by pianist Jeffrey Sykes, who graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music and now teaches at the University of California-Berkeley; and by Stephanie Jutt, professor of flute at the UW-Madison School of Music who is also principal flute of the Madison Symphony Orchestra.

Here is a link to the BDDS website with information about tickets, programs, venues and performers:

http://www.bachdancinganddynamite.org

Recently, Jutt (below) spoke to The Ear about the upcoming season, which runs June 10-26:

StephanieJuttNoCredit

“This silver anniversary season has something for everybody, and we’ve made it extra special in every way, with personnel, with repertoire and with audience favorites that we’re bringing back.

“In the first week, we have two short pieces by our featured composer, Kevin Puts “Air for Flute and Piano” and “Air for Violin and Piano,” and the world premiere of “In at the Eye: Six Love Songs on Yeats’ Poetry,” a piece we co-commissioned, with several other participating festivals, from the American composer Kevin Puts (below).

We commissioned him just before he won the Pulitzer Prize, luckily for us! We have performed several works by him in the past (“Einstein on Mercer Street,” “Traveler” and “Seven Seascapes”), and he will be here for the premiere performances at the Overture Playhouse and the Hillside Theater at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesen compound in Spring Green.

(NOTE: Composer Kevin Puts will speak about “How Did You Write That?” at the FREE family concert on this coming Saturday, to be held 11-11:45 a.m. in The Playhouse of the Overture Center.)

Kevin Puts pulitzer

“In Week 2, we have three crazy, inspired works by Miguel del Aguila (below), a Uruguayan composer from Montevideo, who now lives in Los Angeles, that we commissioned and premiered. We’ll be performing “Salon Buenos Aires,” the piece that we commissioned, along with “Presto II” and “Charango Capriccioso.”

Miguel del Aguila

During Week Two, we are also bringing back the amazing pianist, arranger and raconteur Pablo Zinger (below), also originally from Uruguay and a longtime New Yorker, to perform his arrangements of movie music by Nino Rota, Henry Mancini and others, as well as some of Pablo’s brilliant arrangements of tangos by Astor Piazzolla.

Pablo Zinger at piano

“In Week 3, we are bringing back the “Four Seasons of Buenos Aires” by Astor Piazzolla and the “Four Seasons” by Antonio Vivaldi. People have begged us to repeat this program for years. It’s one of the most thrilling programs we’ve done, and this seems like the perfect time to return to this beloved repertoire. (You can hear the Summer section of Piazzolla’s Four Season of Buenos Aires in the youTube video at the bottom.)

“In the same Week Three, you will also hear some favorite works, the Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 by Johann Sebastian Bach and, in Week 1, Franz Schubert’s final song cycle, “Schwanengesang” (Swan Songs”) with one of our favorite artists, bass-baritone Timothy Jones (below top). That third week also features the Ravel Piano Trio with the San Francisco Trio (below bottom), comprised of Axel Strauss on violin, Jean-Michel Fontaneau on cello, and JeffreySykes on piano.

Timothy Jones posed portrait

BDDS 2014 San Francisco Trio

“We wanted to repeat special things and also do new pieces. Some of the music has links to the number 25 for our 25th anniversary – like Opus 25 for the Piano Quartet by Johannes Brahms or the Piano Concerto No. 25 by Mozart.

“We’re spending a lot more on artist fees this summer – it increases our budget by a lot, but it makes for a very special 25th season. We will have special mystery guests and special door prizes, as we love to do, and some special audience participation activities. (Below is a standing ovation from the audience at The Playhouse.)

BDDS 2014 Playhouse standing ovation

“Did we think we would reach 25 years when we started? Of course not! We didn’t even think we’d reach two. It was started on such a lark.

“But the festival resonated with the summer audience and has every single year. I think we’ve been a success because listeners love to approach serious music with a light touch. You don’t have to behave very seriously to play serious music in a serious way. Artists from all over the United States come to play with the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society and it’s what draws them back year after year.

“We make a huge effort to make the music approachable, for ourselves as well as the audience. We talk about the music itself, about what it is like to learn it, and what it’s like to be together in such an intense way during the festival.

“We try to share the whole experience with the audience, and it’s something you just don’t find anywhere else. The concert doesn’t just go on in front of you, presented on a fancy plate. It surrounds you and you are a part of it.”


Classical music: The critically acclaimed vocal group Cantus sings about four kinds of love at the Stoughton Opera House this Saturday night. The Stoughton High School Concert Choir is a special guest performer.

March 30, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Ear has received word about an intriguing and appealing performance this weekend:

On this Saturday night at 7:30 p.m., Cantus (below top, in a photo by Curtis Johnson), the critically acclaimed, nine-voice men’s vocal ensemble based in the Twin Cities, will perform at the Stoughton Opera House (below middle and bottom), known for its historical restoration and its fine acoustics.

Cantus Railing Clustered

Stoughton Opera House ext

StoughtonOperaHouse,JPG

Love has been the inspiration for artistic expression since the dawn of time. It is such a complex idea that the ancient Greeks broke it down into four different kinds: romantic, familial, friendly and unconditional or spiritual love.

Weaving together repertoire and interstitial remarks, Cantus regards this unquantifiable emotion from all sides.

The program spans multiple historical eras and cultural traditions.

It features music by Francis Poulenc, Edvard Grieg, Ludwig van Beethoven and Bobby McFerrin.

Each of those works is paired with newly commissioned works exploring each of the four loves (romantic, familial, friendly and spiritual) by Pulitzer Prize-winner David Lang (below top, in a photo by Peter Serling) as well as Roger Treece (second below), Joseph Gregorio (third below) and Ysaye Barnwell (below bottom).

david lang CR peter serling

Roger Treece

Joseph Gregorio

Ysaye Barnwell

The program brims with Cantus’s trademark programming juxtaposition, including pairing the Beach Boys’ “Their Hearts were Full of Spring” with  “Wedding Qawwali” by the Grammy Award- and Academy Award-winning Indian composer A. R. Rahman (below) and Michael McGlynn’s setting of the traditional Gaelic “Ceann Dubh Dilis (Her Sweet Dark Head)” in a set about romantic love.

A. R, Rahman

While seemingly disjointed on its face, the variety of repertoire throughout blends seamlessly and highlights the universality of Love – our greatest and most fragile gift.

For more information about Cantus, including biographies, photos, videos and audio samples, visit this link:

http://www.allianceartistmanagement.com/artist.php?id=cantus&aview=dpk

Here is a YouTube video about the program, with musical samples, to be performed in Stoughton:


Classical music: Clocks in Motion will perform percussion works in Stoughton this Saturday night

February 10, 2016
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Ear has received the following invitation from the Madison-based percussion ensemble Clocks in Motion (below), which has released a CD, is building quite the reputation and  is receiving a lot of critical acclaim:

Clocks in Motion Group Collage Spring 2015

Hi everyone!

I would like to cordially invite you to Clocks in Motion’s upcoming concert at the historic Stoughton Opera House (below) at 7:30 p.m. on this coming Saturday, February 13.

Stoughton Opera House ext

StoughtonOperaHouse,JPG

We have a great program including music by Steve Reich, Marc Mellits, John Cage and James Tenney (below).

James Tenney

In addition, we will be joined by composer/guest artist Marc Mellits (below), in performing his mallet quintet “Gravity.” (You can hear Clocks in Motion performing the Minimalist and hypnotic “Gravity” in a YouTube video at the bottom.)

marc mellits 1

You might also want to check out our all new concert TEASER video here: https://youtu.be/WYxMELVVQEg

Tickets are $15 and are available at the door or for advanced sales online HERE

Even if you can’t make the concert, could you please help spread the word or just let your friends, family, students, and colleagues know about the event?

Sincerely,

Sean Kleve, Clocks in Motion Percussion


Classical music: Lesson 1 from the 2015 season of the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society: Chamber music transcriptions, arrangements and reductions of large orchestral works deserve a wider hearing.

July 1, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

The Madison-based Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society finished up its three-week, 24th annual season this past weekend.

The populist chamber music group used local and imported artists to perform six programs over three weekends in three different venues -– all based around the theme of “Guilty as Charged,” which meant emphasizing borrowings and similar transgressionsTalk about a hard-working group of performing artists!

BDDS poster 2015

Over the next week or two, The Ear wants to share some of the lessons that he learned from attending several of the BDS concerts.

Today is Lesson 1: Chamber music transcriptions, arrangements and reductions of large orchestral works deserve a wider hearing so that more people can enjoy those works more often.

I cite two examples from the “Crooked Business” program that BDDS performed at the Stoughton Opera House (below, where I saw and heard it) and at the Hillside Theatre on the Taliesin compound of architect Frank Lloyd Wright in Spring Green.

StoughtonOperaHouse,JPG

First, there was the Piano Concerto No. 24 in C Minor, K. 491, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. BDDS co-founder, co-artist director and house pianist Jeffrey Sykes led the group of 11 players from the keyboard and played with his back to the audience.

(Believe it or not, if The Ear recalls music history correctly, that was the standard performance practice, as was playing with the score, until the legendary piano virtuoso Franz Liszt turned the piano to the side to highlight his dramatic profile and also memorized the music to astonish his audiences.)

The Mozart piano concerto is a great work — you can hear the whole work in its full orchestral version with pianist Mitsuko Uchida in a YouTube video at the bottom. And the arrangement or reduction they used made it seem even more remarkable. That is because the smaller size of the forces allowed one to hear more clearly the interplay of various parts.

BDDS 2015 Mozart C minor piano concerto

Then on the second half of the program came a second example: The Serenade No. 1 in D Major, Op 11 (1857) by Johannes Brahms. It was performed with nine players in a reduction by Christopher Nex.

The Ear found the work to be a bit too long and repetitive — the structure of its six movements lacked the tightness of a symphony. But then again, a tuneful serenade is by definition supposed to be lighter and have a looser structure, to spur more relaxed and informal listening and to demand less focused attention.

BDDS 2015 Brahms Serenade 1

Such reductions originated in the desire of amateurs to make house music at a time when professional orchestras and chamber music groups and commercial concerts did not exist in a widespread way.

It is an approach that can and should be revived. To be fair, the Token Creek Chamber Music Festival has also done a few of these transcriptions or arrangements, often with the Harvard University Mozart scholar and pianist Robert Levin.

But nonetheless it is largely thanks to the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society that listeners can make their way through the 27 piano concertos by Mozart and the 104 symphonies by Franz Joseph Haydn -– to say nothing of the many Baroque, Classical, Romantic and modern works that must already exist in similar arrangements or could be rearranged on demand.

To which The Ear simply says: Bravo! Do more of them!

What do you say?

The Ear -– along with BDDS organizers and performers – wants to hear.


Classical music: Here is the new season in June of the Madison-based Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society.

May 12, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

There are still some smaller-scale concerts left to the season – some chamber music and vocal music by the Oakwood Chamber Players and the Madison Choral Project, for example.

But the next big series of classical music events on tap are the concerts over three weekends in Madison, Stoughton and Spring Green during June by the Madison-based Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society (below).

bddsgroup

As usual, the group – co-founded and co-directed by UW-Madison professor and Madison Symphony Orchestra principal flute Stephanie Jutt and pianist Jeffrey Sykes, a UW-Madison grad who teaches in Berkeley — is known for showcasing well-known and neglected works as well as imported and local musicians.

Stephanie jutt and Jeffrey Sykes  CR C&N photographers

For full information, including tickets information and samples from the 2014 season, here is a link to the BDDS website:

http://www.bachdancinganddynamite.org

In the meantime, here is a round-up of this summer’s programs and a schedule of performances.

WEEK ONE | JUNE 12, 13, 14

Stephanie Jutt, flute

Jeffrey Sykes, piano
 Sponsored by Ellen White, in memory 
of Barbara Ekholm

Katarzyna Bryla, violin

Parry Karp (below top), cello
 Sponsored by Sue Cleary Koch

Timothy Jones, bass-baritone

Emily Birsan (below middle), soprano

Thomas Kasdorf (below bottom), piano
 Sponsored by Tim Teitelbaum, 
in memory of Susan Horwitz

Parry Karp

Emily Birsan MSO 2014

thomas kasdorf 2:jpg

 STOLEN MOMENTS

Johann Sebastian Bach: Arias and Duets — Sponsored by Carla & Dick Love

Felix Mendelssohn: Cello Sonata in D Major, op. 58

Gian Carlo Menotti: “Steal Me” from The Old Maid and the Thief

Franz Joseph Haydn: Divertimento in G Major, Hob. IV: 7 — Sponsored by Barbara Johnson

Ludwig van Beethoven: Scottish and Irish Folk Songs and Duets

The Playhouse, Overture Center, Madison on 
Friday, June 12, 7:30 PM

Hillside Theater, Taliesin, Spring Green
 Sunday on June 14, 2:30 PM

ROB THE CRADLE

Dick Kattenburg: Sonata for flute and piano

Dmitri Shostakovich: Seven Romances on Poems of Alexander Blok, op. 127

Modest Mussorgsky: Songs and Dances of Death

Louise Farrenc: Trio in E minor, op. 45

The Playhouse (below), Overture Center, Madison on 
Saturday, June 13, 7:30 PM

Hillside Theater, Taliesin, Spring Green
 on Sunday, June 14, 6:30 PM

BDDS Playhouse audience

WEEK TWO | JUNE 19, 20, 21

Stephanie Jutt, flute

Jeffrey Sykes, piano
 Sponsored by Ellen White, in memory 
of Barbara Ekholm

Axel Strauss, violin Sponsored by James Dahlberg & 
Elsebet Lund

Jean-Michel Fonteneau, cello 
Sponsored by Dan & Karen Baumann

Alan Kay, clarinet 
Sponsored by Vicki & Jerry Stewart and Katherine Naherny & Roger Ganser

Thomas Kasdorf, piano
 Sponsored by Anne & Peter Wadsack

Axel Strauss

Jean-Michel Fonteneau

Alan Kay 1 BDDS 2014

HONOR AMONG THIEVES

Johann Sebastian Bach: Trio Sonata in G Major, BWV 1038

John Harbison: Songs America Loves to Sing

Ludwig van Beethoven: Trio in E-flat Major, op. 38, arranged from the Septet, op. 20

Stoughton Opera House on 
Friday, June 19, 7:30 PM

Hillside Theater, Taliesin, Spring Green
 on Sunday, June 21, 2:30 PM

BREAKING AND ENTERING

Florent Schmitt: Sonatina in trio, op. 85 — Sponsored by Jane & David Villa

Paul Schoenfield: Country Fiddle Pieces Sponsored by Martha & Charles Casey

Paul Desenne: Haydn Tuyero, Chicharras, Galeones Sponsored by Jane Blumenfeld & Willow Harth

Johannes Brahms: Piano Trio in B Major, op. 8 — Sponsored by Jacob Stockinger, in memory of Judy Schwaemle

The Playhouse, Overture Center, Madison on Saturday, June 20, 7:30 PM

Hillside Theater, Taliesin, Spring Green 
on Sunday, June 21, 6:30 PM

StoughtonOperaHouse,JPG

WEEK THREE | JUNE 26, 27, 28

Stephanie Jutt, flute

Jeffrey Sykes, piano
 Sponsored by Ellen White, in memory 
of Barbara Ekholm

Romie de Guise-Langloise, clarinet

Orlando Pimentel, clarinet

Cynthia Cameron-Fix, bassoon

Richard Todd, horn

Carmit Zori (below), violin
 Sponsored by Daphne Webb

Hyejin Lee, violin

Ara Gregorian, viola 
Sponsored by the family of John Stoelting, 
in loving memory

Katja Linfield, cello

Zachary Cohen, bass

CarmitZori0752

CROOKED BUSINESS

Johann Sebastian Bach: Sonata in B minor, BWV 1030Sponsored by Linda & Keith Clifford

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto in C minor, K. 491 — Sponsored by Norma & Elliott Sober

Johannes Brahms: Serenade in D Major, op. 11, arr. Alan Boustead — Sponsored by Michael Bridgeman, in honor of Jack Holzhueter

Stoughton Opera House on 
Friday, June 26, 7:30 PM

Hillside Theater (below), Taliesin, Spring Green
 on Sunday, June 28, 2:30 PM

HIGHWAY ROBBERY

Claude Debussy: Première Rhapsodie — Sponsored by Tim Teitelbaum, in memory of Susan Horwitz

Kevin Puts: Seven Seascapes Sponsored by Miriam Simmons & Jim Cain

Franz Peter Schubert: Octet in F Major, D. 803 — Sponsored by Larry Bechler & Patty Struck

The Playhouse, Overture Center, Madison on 
Saturday, June 27, 7:30 PM

Hillside Theater (below), Taliesin, Spring Green on 
Sunday, June 28, 6:30 PM

taliesin_hillside2

 

 


Classical music: What music would celebrate Super Bowl XLIX – that’s 49 in plain English – that takes place this afternoon? Plus, the Con Vivo chamber music concert this afternoon in Stoughton has been POSTPONED until next Sunday night.

February 1, 2015
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ALERT: The administration of the Stoughton Opera House has decided to postpone the chamber music concert by Con Vivo (below) scheduled for this afternoon, Feb. 1, due to the anticipated snow storm.

The new concert date and time is: next Sunday, Feb. 8, at 7:30 p.m. at the Stoughton Opera House. Please help spread the word to anyone you know who might have been planning to come to the concert. Says the group: “We look forward to seeing you next week! Stay safe and warm. Thank you.”

Con Vivo core musicians

By Jacob Stockinger

Today, Super Bowl XLIX — or 49 to most of us — will be played between the Seattle Seahawks and the New England Patriots in Glendale, Arizona.

Super Bowl 49 social media logos

Kickoff time is 5:30 p.m., CST.

It will be broadcast on NBC.

The game is billed as the world’s largest single sports event.

Given the number of people it will reach via TV and other social media, and given the advertising price of $4.5 million for a 30-second spot, that description sounds pretty accurate.

Super Bowl XLIX no cactus

Here are some suggestions from past years:

Super Bowl 48 in 2014:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2014/02/02/classical-music-what-classical-music-goes-best-with-the-nfls-super-bowl-48-football-championship-today-plus-university-of-wisconsin-madison-singers-and-instrumentalists-movingly-celebrate-franz-s/

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2014/02/02/classical-music-what-classical-music-goes-best-with-the-nfls-super-bowl-48-football-championship-today-plus-university-of-wisconsin-madison-singers-and-instrumentalists-movingly-celebrate-franz-s/

football

Super Bowl 47 in 2013, which drew a lot of reader suggestions and comments:

https://welltempered.wordpress.com/2013/02/03/classical-music-what-classical-music-goes-best-with-super-bowl-47-today-since-there-are-fewer-live-concerts-to-attend-that-conflict-with-the-football-game/

Let us know what you think.

The Ear wants to hear.

 


Classical music: Con Vivo — Music With Life — will perform chamber music by Mozart, Gershwin, Prokofiev, Bruch and others at the Stoughton Opera House this Sunday afternoon – BEFORE kickoff time for Super Bowl XLIX.

January 29, 2015
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By Jacob Stockinger

Our friends at the outstanding local chamber music group “Con Vivo” (Music With Life), which made its Carnegie Hall debut last season, has sent the following word:

Hello Friends,

The Madison-based chamber music ensemble con vivo! … music with life (below) invites you to our debut performance at the Stoughton Opera House on this Sunday afternoon, Feb. 1, at 3 p.m.

Con Vivo core musicians

The concert will feature music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, George Gershwin, Sergei Prokofiev, Max Bruch and John Williams.

The musicians in Con Vivo are professionals who often play in other noted ensembles including the Madison Symphony Orchestra and the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra.

The beautifully restored Stoughton Opera House (below, from the outside and inside) is located at 381 E. Main St. Stoughton. For more information, call (608) 877-4400.

Stoughton Opera House ext

StoughtonOperaHouse,JPG

Stoughton Opera House 2

You can get tickets at the door or by visiting www.stoughtonoperahouse.com The prices are $20 for regular admission and $10 for an obstructed view.

It’s sad that the Packers aren’t playing in Super Bowl XLIX — that’s 49 to normal people — but if you intend to watch the big game anyway, come spend your pre-game with us. You will be home in time for the kick-off!

We hope to see you this Sunday.

Here is the complete program:

Sergei Prokofiev: Overture on Hebrew Themes for piano, string quartet and clarinet, Op. 34

Max Bruch: Romance for Viola and Piano, Op. 85

Jay Ungar: “Ashokan Farewell for violin and piano. (It was famously used in the Ken Burns documentary ‘The Civil War.” You can hear it in a lovely and moving YouTube video that features the composer at the bottom.)

John Williams: Air and Simple Gifts for violin, cello, clarinet and piano

INTERMISSION

George Gershwin: Preludes for solo piano

Andante con moto e poco rubato

Allegro ben ritmato e deciso

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet, KV 581

Allegro, Andante, Menuetto, Rondo


Classical music: Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra Chorus to hold auditions for Handel’s “Messiah” next Wednesday, Oct. 1. Rehearsals start Oct. 29 for performances on December 11, 12 and 13.

September 26, 2014
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By Jacob Stockinger

The following announcement comes from our friends at the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra (below):

WCO lobby

andrewsewell

The Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra Chorus announces auditions for its 2014 performance of George Frideric Handel’s Baroque oratorio “Messiah.” (You can hear the most famous chorus — the Hallelujah Chorus —  at the bottom in a popular YouTube video that has almost 3 million hits.)

This year, the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and Chorus, under the baton of longtime WCO music director and conductor Andrew Sewell, will perform “Messiah” at the Blackhawk Church in Middleton (below top), the Stoughton Opera House (below middle) and the Al Ringling Theater (below bottom) in Baraboo.

BlackhawkMessiah

StoughtonOperaHouse,JPG

Al Ringing Theatre

Come be a part of the six-year tradition of “Messiah” with the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and guest soloists.

Auditions will be held next Wednesday, October 1. Rehearsals begin October 29. If you are interested, contact wcoauditions@gmail.com with your name, phone number and email address to set up an audition time. You can also call (608) 257-0638.

Note:  Rehearsals are on Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m.  Performances are December 11, 12 and 13.

 

 

 

 

 


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